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Senior ^y^nnuut 



BROOKLYN TALMUDICAL ACADEMY 

1060 PRESIDENT ST. BROOKLYN, N, Y 








Dedication 3 

Administration 4 

Faculty Advisers 5 

Elchanite Staff 6 

Faculty 8 

Graduating Classes 12 

Graduates 15 

Senior Annals 41 

Diary 42 

Montage 44 

Hall of Fame 46 

Activities 47 

G. 48 

Student Court 50 

Arista 52 

Service Squad 54 

Debating Society 56 

Library 58 

T. A. Publications 60 

Athletics 62 

Co-op Store 66 

A Student's Life 67 

Variety Night 72 

Literature 73 

Jews in Science — By Josef E. Fisher 74 

Chaim Weizmann — By Leonard Indyk 77 

Reminiscing — By Sanwel H. Lebowitz 80 

Sinclair Lewis — By Lionel d'ossbard 88 

A Freshie's Lament — 

A Poem — By Reeve R. Brenner .... 86 

Fate — A Poem — By David Levine 87 

The Good Old Days — 

A Poem — By Allan J. Scher 87 

Trust Pal — By Larry Schindler 88 

Israel Through Its Stamps By Eli Lazar 90 

State Scholarship Winners 92 

Advertisements 93 




^edccatcoH 




In an effort to employ - 
for good or evil — the pc 
tencies released by atomi 
energy, man is ushering i 
a new era to comprehend 
and develop the forces of 
nature. Within the last dec- 
ade, science has achieved 
that which was formerly be- 
yond the realm of human 
comprehension. 

We are indeed grateful 
for this occasion to express our appreciation to innumerable 
scientists, particularly those Jewish scientists who altruistically 
contributed to the promotion of the general welfare. We value, 
in addition, this opportunity to render gratitude to our own science 
faculty for their tireless efforts to imbue us with the spirit and 
enthusiasm for attaining clarified perception of fact. 

Therefore, we, the graduating class of June, 1953, humbly 
dedicate this "Elchanite' to all seekers for the basic truths of 
science, and to those scholars of our own faith in particular. 





DR. SAMUEL BELKIN 
President 





DR. SHELLEY R. SAPHIRE 
Principal 




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RABBI ABRAHAM N. ZUROFF 
Administrator 




K T is with extreme joy that we congratulate the 
class of 1953. May you reflect in your daily lives 
the harmonious blending of Torah knowledge and 
the wisdom of Hellas, with keener emphasis on 
the "beauty of holiness" rather than the "holiness 
of beauty". In this spirit we bid you farewell. 

THE ADMINISTRATION 



MR. SAMUEL LH\'h\H 
Executive Director 



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Robert Bassell, Literature; Rabbi Perlman, Photography; 
Rabbi Faivelson, General Adviser; Mr. Harrv- Allan, Art. 



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MR. ALLAN, A n 




MR. BRENDER, French and Spanish 



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MR. BASSELL, English 




MR. CAN lOR, Spanish 





MR. EPSTEIN, Mathematics 



RABBI FAIVELSON, Hebrew 




MR. KALLNER, Science 



MR. LANDOWNE, Scie„ce 



— 9 — 




DR. LICHTENSTEIN, French and Hebrew 




MR. MELOV, Social Sciences 





MR. MORSE, Physical Education 



RABBI PERLMAN, Hebrew 



10- 




v: I. 

DR. SARACHEK, Euglish 




MR. SEPTIMUS, Mathematics 




MR. n K|{ISK^, Matlu'watics 



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MR. WALLACH, Mathematics 



MRS. LEVITON, Secretary 



— 11- 



rs 







Class 8a — 

Front row, left-right: P. Sultan, A. Scher, R. Simon. M. Leifer, M. Askowitz, 
P. Kolker, D. Weiss, E. Preis. 

Second row, M. Silberberg, H. Fleischer, H. Schneier, W. Sussman, J. Solo- 
mon, M. Salzman, S. Chwat. 

Third row, left-right: N. Sinowitz, M. Blulh, M. Edelstein, E. Beckman, S. 
Levenson, I. Landwirth, J. Fischer. 



Class of June, '53 



Class of June, '53 



Class 8b — 

Front row, left-right: J. Blazer, H. Pollock, M. Adler, S. Feit, S. Schimmel, 

R. Brenner, M. Botknecht, H. Shapiro. 

Second row, lelt-right: P. Felig, C. Genn, S. Waltzman, R. Meyers, A. HeH- 

er, M. Hagler, D. Kolatch. 

Third row, left-right: I. Schwartz, A. Schrank, H. Udewitz, E. Glick, J. Fur- 

mansky, A. Guttman, Z. Kubersky. 




a r p. p r* f^ R p 




Class 8c — 

Front row, left-right: I. Fuchs, R. Levine, Z. Schroder, J. Lebowitz, L. Schind- 
ler, A. Rozman, I. Serchuk, H. Hoffman, S. Cohen, N. Bryks. 
Second row, left-right; M. Greenspan, J. Polir.sky, P. Banner, B. Hochdorf, 
H. Rothman, D. Baker, J. Becker, S. Hymowitz, H. Kriegsman, J. Kurtz. 
Third row, left-right: A. Rubins, L. Indyk, S. Feder, M. Goldman, D. Fuchs, 
N. Gordon, R. Rudman, L. Grossbard, G. Goldfine, J. Silverstein. 



Class of June, '53 



i. 



une. 



'53 



MELVIN ADLER 

Arista 5-8; Student Court 7; Associate Edi- 
-tor-in- Chief of Elchanite 7, 8; School De- 
hating Team 5; Class Debating Team 1, 2; 
T.A. Topics — Editor-in-Chief 6: Co-Editor 
5: Reporter 3, 4; Editor-in-Chief of "La 
Vnz"; Seri'ice Squad 5, 6; Library Squad 
5, 6. 

Mel, who is a Talmudist from Boro Park, was 
co-editor of that renowned Spanish newspaper, 
"La Voz". As editor-in-chief of our school news- 
paper, he revolutionized its printing process by 
establishing a new and better type of print. 

"Written with a pen of iron, and with the 
point of a diamond." — Jeremiah XVIII L 



MARTIN ASKOWITZ 

Associate Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 
8; Junior Varsity Basketball 5; Class Presi- 
dent 8; Class Sanitation Manager 3; Class 
Athletic Manager 2, 4-7; T.A. Topics — 
Sports Editor 4, 5; President of Photography 
Club 1; Service Squad 1-5; School Band 6. 

"Oscar," the Romeo of Rabbi Drillman's class, is 
"going to the dogs". He is leaving us in pursuit 
of the degree of Dr. of Veterinary Medicine at 
Cornell. He'll bark his way up the tree of life. 



'All mankind loi>e a lover" 



— Emerson 



DAVID M. BAKER 

Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; Art 
Editor of Kolenu 7, 8; Elchantite Art Squad 
3, 4; Junior Varsity Basketball 3, 4; Class 
Vice-President 1; Class Debating Team 1-4; 
Class Athletic Manager 2; Vice-President of 
Public Speaking Club 2; Service Squad 7. 
Despite the fact that he joined us a year late, 

Dave accomplished the feat of making High 
School in three years. School was a sideline to 
his photography business. His e.xperience with a 
camera should make preparation for a later career 
a "snap" to him. 

One picture is worth a thousand faces. 



— 15 — 



PHILIP BANNER 

Class Sanitation Manager 4; TA. Topics — 
Reporter 7; Secretary of Music Club 6; 
Service Squad 7. 

Phil is known as the "Phil of all trades" because 
of his interest in all activities. His optimistic 
attitude toward everything has made him a con- 
stant bright light in T.A. His ambition will be 
realized when he embarks on a career of journal- 
ism at Y.U. 

"Character is ivhat you are in the dark." 

— Moody. 



JACOB BECKER 

Junior Varsity 5, 6; Class Secretary-Treas- 
urer 5; Vice-President of Spanish Club 2, 3; 
Service Squad 7, 8; Library Squad 3-8. 

Jackie, who is a combination of strong man and 
comedian, kept his class ""in stitches" for four 
years. As one of Dr. Lichtenstein's favorite (?) 
and most beloved (.') pupils, he was instru- 
mental in breaking the good Doctor's record with 
a "maximum 65". Jackie expects to continue his 
studies at City College and major in Economics. 

"Humor is the harmony of the heart." — Jerrold 



EPHRAIM M. BECKMAN 

Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 8 ; Elcha- 
nite Art Squad 6; Class Vice-President 8; 
T..4. Topics — Reporter 4-6; Vice-President 
of Photography Club 1; Laboratory Assist- 
ant 5; Service Squad 8; Library Squad 1, 2. 

Mark, our Elchanite Business Manager, has a 
smile for everyone (with an ad). During his 
tenure in Rabbi Shussheim's class, he filled the 
air with "laughing gas". As a result, he'll become 
a dentist and torcure people. 

"Money is honey, my little sonny. 
And a rich man's joke is always funny." 

— Brown 




i 



16- 











JACOB BLAZER 

T.A. Topics — Typing Squad 5, 6; President 
of Music Club 7, 8; Library Squad 7, 8; 
Office Squad 7, 8. 

A scientist at home as well as in school, Joel 
raised everything from fish to birds. As Dinah's 
No. 1 boy, he can be seen spending most of the 
day in the school office, though he does attend 
classes for a few periods. 

"/ love fools' experiments, I am always making 
them." — Darwin 



MORTON BLUTH 

Elchanite Art Squad 7, 8; Junior Varsity 
Basketball 5. 6; Producer of Variety Night 
8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 8; Class Sani- 
tation Manager 5, 6; Class Debating Manager 
5; Class Debating Team 5-8; Service Squad 7. 

As the Hercules of Rabbi Yogel's class, Morty 
showed himself able mentally as well as physically. 
He'll take his talent for leadership to Y.U. (and 
lead a merry life). 

"His lines were cast in manly mould, 
For hardy sports or contest bold." — Scott 



MICHA BOTKNEGHT 

G.O. President 7. 8; Student Court 7, 8; El- 
chanite Art Editor 7, 8; Elchanite Art Squad 
1-6; Kolenu Art Squad 7, 8; Class President 
1, 2; Class Vice-President 3; Class Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 4; Class Debating Team 2, 3; 
Service Squad 5. 

The school broke tradtion by electing Micha to 
a second term as school president. The FDR of 
T.A., he has to his credit man\ revolutionary re- 
forms instituted in our school. Yes, Micha was 
very sincere in T.A., but even more 'Frank' in 
Central. 

"The deed is everything, the glory naught." 

— Goethe 



— 17- 




ROBERT BRENNER 

Associate Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 
8; Varsity Basketball 7, 8; T.A. Topics — 
Reporter 8; Library Squad 8; Office Squad 8. 
Reeve is considered by many an even better poet 
than an athlete (if that is possible). With his 
knack for writing and his natural athletic ability, 
he has been a sport of sports in all sporting 
events. 

"The man is either mad, or he is making verse." 

— Horace 




NATHAN BRYKS 

Arista 8; Co-Editor of Kolenu 7, 8; Class 
Vice-President 8 ; Secretary of Hebrew Cul- 
ture Club 8. 

Naftali joined us a little late — in second term. 
He made himself useful by being chief translator 
(of Yiddish) for the class and, being a native 
of Poland, was the only one that could learn 
portions of the Talmud not cut out for American- 
born students. This fall, Naftali will shift head- 
quarters to Y.U. and establish his linguistic fame 
there. 

"Words, idle words, I know not what they 
mean." — stolen partly from Tennyson 




SHELDON CHWAT 

Junior Varsity Basketball 5, 6; T.A. Topics 
— Sports Editor 7, 8; Reporter 4; Service 
Squad 8; Library Squad 4-8. 
"Hot Shelly" (not to be confused with a certain 
party of the same name) was one of our Chaim 
Berlin imports. His four year cruise through 
T.A.'s halls was only marred by an occasional 
report card. 

Very nice, not too shy, 

Shelly is really a very nice guy. 



— 18- 



SEYMOUR COHEN 

Arista 7, 8; Student Court 8; School Debat- 
ing Manager 8; School Debating Team 7. 8; 
Class Debating Manager 8; Class Debating 
Team 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8; Vice-President of Pub- 
lic Speaking Club 5; Service Squad 5, 6. 

A complete success with Dr. Sarachek, Seymour 
glided through T.A. with laughter and confidence. 
His ever-flowing words of wisdom caused his 
election to the post of Debating Manager (and 
often got him into trouble with Mr. Lilker). In 
the future Seymour will try somehow to fit his 
oratoiical abilities to the field of medicine. 

"Why don't you speak for yourself, Jimmy?" 
— partly from Longfellow 



CHARLES CUTTER 

Hebrew Club 1 ; Glee Club 7; Service Squad 
7; Office Squad 6-8. 

Charlie, our happy-go-lucky classmate, almost was 
forced to retire from his job as office boy be- 
cause of the antics of our History Professor. 
Charlie was our silent partner during his four 
year stay at T.A. and expects to attend City 
College and major in accounting. 

^^ f 

'Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and 
smile, smile, smile." 



MEYER EDELSTEIN 

Elchanite Art Squad 4, 7, 8; Service Squad 
8; Library Squad 2, 6-8; Glee Club 7 

In his stay in T.A., Meyer has proven to be a 
conscientious student. He will pre-med at Y.U. 
and hopes to be one of the first graduates of 
the Albert Einstein Medical School. 

Smiling, cheerful and dependable 
Everything about hitn is commendable 



— 19 — 



SOLOMON FEDER 

G. O. Secretary-Treasurer 7; Manager of 
G. O. Cooperative Store 7, 8; Class Vice- 
President 5; Class Secretary-Treasurer 3; 
Class Debating Team 4, 6; T. A. Topics - 
Feature Editor 8: Reporter 7; Vice-President 
of French Club 4; Service Squad 5, 6; Libra- 
ry Sqiiad 8 ; 

Since Shlomo founded the CO-OP store, the G.O. 
bank account has run all the way into two figures 
One of the fine learners in the morning, he led 
the inhalation (Sniff-Sniff) squad, Solomon will 
follow in the footsteps of his brothers and study 
for the rabbinate. 

Solomon, wisest of all kings, 

Knows Talmud amongst other things. 





SANFORD FEIT 

Class Debating Manager 8; Class Debating 
Team 1-3. 7. 8; Spanish Club 2, 4, 5; Music 
Club 3. 6. 7; 

An understudy of Chuck Dressen, our Human 
P.A. system, called "Footsie", was able to win the 
Hearst Journal-American History Contest among 
the Yeshivas of our fair city. He prefers the 
New York Times to the T.A. Topics because 
of its higher caloric value. In American History, 
he thinks Feit is far superior to Beard or Hacker. 

"All I knoiv is what I see in the papers." 

— Will Rogers 




-* O-K?* 




PHILIP FELIG 



Arista Leader 8; Arista 5-8; Student C otirt 
7; G. O. Secretary-Treasurer 5; Associate 
Activities Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; School 
Debating Team 5-8; Class Vice-President 7; 
Class Debating Manager 1, 2, 4; Class Debat- 
ing Team 1-8; T.A. Topics - Editor-in-Chief 
7: News Editor 3, 6: Reporter 4, 5, 8; Pre- 
sident of Spanish Club 2; 

Phil, who aspires to be a doctor, has the distinc- 
tion of holding top honors in the graduating 
class. In oratory he has hardly a match, and 
has done an awful lot of work (with the emphasis 
on awful) for the betterment of our school. 



'For knowledge too, is itself a power." 




Bacon 




— 20 — 



JOSEF E. FISCHER 

Arista 7, S; Associate Editor-in-Chief of El- 
chanite 7, H; Elchanite Art Squad 4; School 
Debating Team 8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 
4. 5; Class Debating Team 2-8; T.A. Topics - 
Reporter 4, 5 ; Service Squad 6. 

Joe, our lone entry in the Westinghouse Science 
Talent Search, paid off by placing as one of the 
top in the nation. He will combine his passion 
for Chemical Engineering with his aptitude for 
Talmud at Y.U. 

// he has any faults, he has left us in doubt. 

At least in four years, we could not find them 

out. 



HERBERT PLEISHER 

Arista 8; Class Vice-President 5-7; Class 
Sanitation Manager 8; President of Spanish 
Club 5 ; Service Squad 5. 

One of the "Williamsburgh Boys," Herbie estab- 
lished himself among the tops in both depart- 
ments (Park Dep't. and Dep't. of Sanitation?). 
He'll continue his Yeshiva and secular studies at 
Y.U. in the Fall. 

'7a- Mr. Fleisher, the master of the house, at 
home?" 

'There's nobody here but us Spanish pupils 
Senor." 



DOAV FUCHS 

Service Squad 7; School Baud 5. 6; Office 
Squad 7; T.A. Topics — Typing Squad 5, 6. 

The Harry James of T.A., Doav is now writing his 
autobiography, "Wine, Women and Trumpets." A 
fruly nice fellow, you just can't get enough of him. 

A ic'inning smile, a helping hand. 

Doav's a sicell felloic who ice think is grand. 



21 




JEROME FUCHS 

Arista ,^-8'; Class President 3; Class Vice- 
President 2; Class Secretary-Treasurer 7; 
Vice-President of Zionism Club 6. 

"Itchie," a staunch "Bnei-Akivanik," always has an 
inside scoop on the latest happenings in Aretz. 
(Ee\er)' newspaper editor in the country is on 
his trail). In school he did the most newspaper 
work — for the "Bnei Akiva' weekly. It is his 
aspiration to go to Israel and learn of its current 
affairs firs; hand. 

'''My heart is in the East and I in the uttertnost 
West." — Jtidah Halevi 



JACK FURMANSKY 

T.A. Topics — Typing Squad 8; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Tropical Fish Club 5; Library Squad 
4, 6, S; Office Squad 4, 6-8. 

Good-natured Jack has been the prime factor in 
making Dinah's life in TA bearable. As her per- 
sonal consultant, it is said of him that what 
Dinah didn't know about the office, Jackie did. 

"A real man is he whose goodness is part of 
him." Mencius. 





COLMAN GENN 

Junior Varsity Basketball 3-6; Class Athletic 
Manager 5; Class Debating Team 5, 8; T.A. 
Topics — News Editor 7, 8; Vice-President 
of Spanish Club 2, 4; Captain of Service 
Squad 8 ; Service Squad 6, 7 ; Office Squad 8. 

"Cole's" athletic ability has been a gread aid to 
the school basketball team. Being interested in 
science, and an organized member of the Biology 
"braintrust," he expects to further his studies 
along these lines at Brooklyn College. 



'My titan's as true as steel.' 



— ■ Shakespeare 



— 22- 



EDWARD GLICK 

Photography Editor of Elchauite 7, 8; Class 
Secretary-Treasurer 7; T.A. Topics — Re- 
porter 5, 6; Captain of Service Squad 7; 
Library Squad 3-8; Office Squad 7. 

If you wanted anything from personalized sta- 
tionery to magazine subscriptions, all you had to 
do was see Eddie. As Captain of the Service 
Squad, he was taken aback after issuing a "No 
smoking cigarettes" order, when he had trouble 
explaining to some that the order included cigars. 



'Justice is truth in action." 



GILBERT GOLDFINE 



Disraeli 



G.O. Vice-President 7; Art Editor of El- 
chunite 7, 8; Elchanite Art Squad 3-6; Var- 
sity Basketball 7, 8; Class Vice-President 4; 
Class Secretary-Treasurer 1; Class Athletic 
Manager 3; T.A. Topics — Reporter 1, 2; 
President of Stamp and Coin Club 3 ; Service 
Squad 5, 8. 

Although "Gilly" entered school politics late, he 
became a "huge" success, be:ng elected Vice-Presi- 
dent. Our Art Editor has been contributing 
his talents to the Elchanite since third term. He 
intends to study art and designing at Parson's 
School of Design. 

.lack of all trades, master of most. 



MARTIN GOLDMAN 

Arista 6-8; Secretary of Arista 8; Student 
Court 7; Editor-in-Chief of Kolenu 7, 8; 
Editor of Kolenu S, 6; T..4. Publications 1-4; 
Secretary of School Debating Team 6-8; 
Class Secretary-Treasurer 3, S; Class Debat- 
ing Manager 8; Class Debating Team 6-8; 
T.A. Topics — Editor-in-Chief 8; Service 
Squad 4, 6, 7 ; Library Squad 6, 8. 

Nobod) could ever guess the secret of Marty's 
inexhaustible supply of outside material (he car- 
ried material to school, not books). His myth- 
ology scrapbook was the only book too long for 
Mr. Bassell to finish, and his one word answers 
(bayis) too short for Rabbi Yogel. He intends 
this fall to begin preparations for a degree in 
law and international relations. 

/ stand on my constitutional rights. 



■23- 



NACHUM GORDON 

Arista 7, 8; Editor of Kolenu 5, 6; School 
Debating Manager 7 ; School Debating Team 
7, 8; Class President 7 ; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 4; Class Debating Team 3, 5-8; 
Library Squad 6. 

"Nach" and Rabbi Faivelson were a pair which 
simply could never agree (on marks among other 
things). Occasionally Nach took time out from 
his lunch periods to partake in debating, and was 
debating manager of the school for a term. He got 
a first hand lesson in economics on his trip to 
Macy's and was voted by his class the most 
choosey in picking the home work he copied. 

Eat, drink, and be merry. 
For tomorrow is school. 



JEROME GOTTESMAN 

T.A. Publications 1, 2; Class Debating Man- 
ager 8; Class Debating Team 8; Math Club 7. 

Jerry achieved fame through his well-known 
words, "Very Well." His zealous desire to see 
justice done is leading him to the profession of 
law. When he graduates college, he will join 
the Bar. (Hie!!). 

A future D.A., 

Of him they'll say — 

"Jerry 'got his man,." 



MARTIN GREENSPAN 

Class Debating Team 1, 2, 4-7 ; Class Sanita- 
tion Manager S ; Music Club 8; Service 
Sguad 3, 5, 7. 

Often were the halls of T.A. filled with the 
strains of "Greeny's" sax. The class musician was 
the founder of the school band (retired). Being 
extremely generous, Greeny wishes to become a 
philanthropist. 

He performed a very melodious physics 
experiment. 



— 24 — 




'I|/C% ifyf 




LIONEL GROSSBARD 

Arista Vice-Leader 8; Arista 5-8; Arista 
Secretary 7; Student Court 8; Editor-in-Chief 
of Elchanite 7, 8; Class President 1; Class 
Debating Manager 2-7; Class Debating Team 
2-8; President of Stamp and Coin Club 2. 

Though variety is the spice of Hfe, ""Left\", our 
Editor-in-Chief, sat through nine terms with his 
favorite teacher (two periods one term!). Recog- 
nizing the genius in him, his classmates elected 
him debating manager for seven consecutive terms. 
This term, however, he declined the nomination 
and decided to "rest on his laurels." His object 
in life is to take the Hippocratic Oath. 



— Edison 



"Genius is 5% inspiration and 95% 
perspiration." 



ABRAHAM GUTTMAN 

Elchanite Art Squad 7, 8; Chess and Check- 
ers Club 4; Music Club 7. 

"Abie" the genius (ask him and he'll tell you) 
traveled long and far to attend the "Academy," 
in fact he spends so many hours on the trains 
that he's made the B.M.T. his official residence. 
Being one of those rarities who make high school 
in three years, "Our Hero" is planning to take a 
pre-engineering course in college. 

Where there's a will there's a way. 



MORRIS HAGLER 

Music Club 8; Spanish Club 1; Library 
Sguad 6; Office Squad 7, 8. 

A firm Zionist, Morris, in his spare time, was a 
school librarian and a companion of Mrs. Leviton. 
He has the distinaion of being one of the quietest 
and nicest fellows in the Senior Class. 

"The true university of these days is a collec- 
tion of books." 



— 25- 



ALLEN HELPER 

Varsity Basketball 1, 3, 5-S; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 6; Class Debating Team 6; Class Ath- 
letic Manager; President of Tropical Fish 
Club 6; Library Squad. 

The idol of the Freshmen as T.A.'s high scorer 
in basketball, Al was known in the Senior circles 
as the man with the alibi. He has convinced 
many teachers with his smooth talking and many 
others have succumbed to his alluring smile. After 
graduation Al expects to attend N.Y.U. and major 
in dentistry and basketball. 

"Better a bad excuse than none at all." 

Camden. 




BARRY HOGHDORF 

School Athletic Manager 6; Co-Captain of 
Varsity Basketball Team 3, 7; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 3-8; Class President 5; Class Vice- 
President 1, 4; Class Athletic Manager 2; 
Service Squad 7 , 8. 

Barry majored in basketball in T.A. and came 
out Summa Cum Laude. He claims he had to 
take a few "other" courses to rest up between 
games. 

"/ shot a ball into the air 

It missed the basket by a hair." 

Inspired by Longfellow 



HERBERT HOFFMAN 

Class Vice-President 2; Class Athletic Man- 
ager 8; Class Sanitation Manager 4; Math 
Club S, 6. 

Chaim, one of Mr. Lebowitz's "pets," is really 
a better scientist than we think, for he designed 
the Hoffman Apparatus and wrote a fine book on 
the quantum theory of energy (Who.' Hoffman.'). 
Following the family tradition, he will continue 
his studies uptown at Y.U. 

Beware of this Hoffman, he's ropy and tough 
He'll nag you so long you'll cry it's enough. 
And then he'll just smile, without getting sore 
But soon he will start to do it some more. 



■26 — 



SAUL HYMOWITZ 

Varsity Basketball 7 ; Junior Varsity Basket- 
hall 5." 6; T.A. Topics — Sports Editor 1; 
Service Squad 7. 

Saulie, not to be confused with Zev, was voted 
by his class most likely to score two points per 
basketball game. But he's not to be underesti- 
mated, being a real tennis pro. In the fall he 
will attend C.C.N.Y. and prepare for a career 
in advertising. 

"Out of the hills of Habersham, down the valleys 

of Hall 
Through the streets of Crown Heights, to T.A. 

came Saul." 

— Stolen from Lanier 



LEONARD INDYK 

.Arista 7, 8; Associate Activities Editor of 
Elchanite 7, 8; Elchanite Typist 7, 8; School 
Debating Team 7 ; School Math Team 1, 2; 
Class Vice-President 8 ; Class Debating Man- 
ager 8; Class Debating Team 6-8 ; President 
of Math Club S; Laboratory Assistant 7 ; Of- 
fice Squad 1, 2. 

After attending Lincoln for one year, Lenny 
looked for greener pastures and came to T.A. 
Our math whiz was one of the few survivors of 
Mr. Epstein's trig class. In the fall he will study 
engineering at Cornell. 

"// a man's wit be wandering let him study 
the mathematics." 

— Bacon 



IRWIN KANAREK 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 8; Class Debating 
Team 2 ; Class Sanitation Manager 6, 7 ; T.A. 
Topics — Secretary 8: Reporter 8; Vice- 
President of Science Club 3. 

"Kanar)" is one of the very few that have no 
scholarly appearances but can supply the most 
obscure bits of information at the most unex- 
pected times. This fall he'll switch to Y.U. and 
take pre-med. 

"Praise, like gold and diamonds, owes it value 
only to its scarcity." 

Johnson 




— 27 



DAVID KOLATCH 

Varsity Basketball 3-8; Class Sanitation 
Manager 1; T.A. Topics — Reporter 7, 8; 
Library Squad 7, 8. 

Dave, the best dressed man of 1953, finally con- 
vinced the administration to let him out. For 
advice on the fair sex all we had to do was visit 
Dave. In his spare time, Dave managed to play 
on the school basketball team. 

"The soul of this man is in his clothes." 

— Shakespeare. 



PAUL KOLKER 

Arista S-8; G.O. Secretary-Treasurer 8; El- 
chanite Art Squad 7, 8; Class Secretary-Trea- 
surer 7 ; Class Debating Manager 2; Class 
Debating Team 2-6; T.A. Topics — Reporter 

S. 

The erstwhile Secretary-Treasurer of our G.O., 
Paul straightened out our point system for the 
first time, and engendered the "Informer." He 
will pre-Med at Y.U. in the fall. 

"Do your duty and leave the rest to heaven." 

Corneille 



HERBERT KRIEGSMAN 

G.O. Vice-President 8; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 6, 7 ; Vice-President of French Club 4 ; 
Service Squad 7, 8. 

Herby, one of the best natured seniors, crowned 
his T.A. career with a term as veep. He enjoyed 
success in everything he did, doing it in a silent 
way. His past record seems to indicate that he'll 
achieve his goal of becoming a dentist. 

Born for success he seemed 
With grace to win, with heart to hold." 

— Emerson 



— 28- 



.JOSEPH KURTZ 

Editor-in-Chief of Kolenn 7, 8; Editor of 
Kolenu 5, 6; School Debating Team 5; Class 
Debating Team 1-7 ; T.A. Topics — Reporter 
2, 3; Vice-President of French Club 4. 

His humor was a nemisis to the clever Messrs. 
Lebowitz and Lilker. The Biblist of the class, 
Yushka (Kurtzzz) quoted "psookim" verbatim for 
Rabbi Faivelson. His polyphonic words gave him 
a definite advantage over other debaters (they 
couldn't understand him). In the fall, he'll major 
in psychology and psychiatry at Y.U. 

"Born with a gift of laughter and a sense that 
the world was mad." 

— Sabitini 



ZAVE KUBERSKY 

Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 8; Junior 
Varsity Basketball 3, 4; Class Secretary-Trea- 
surer 1, 2. 

Quiet and retiring (sometimes falling asleep dur- 
ing our morning sessions), Zave was our sole 
delegate from West End Avenue. A self-made 
man (and he worships his maker), he is the only 
senior to graduate with a B.S.A. degree. 

"G-D bless the man who first invented sleep." 

—Sae 



JULIUS LANDWIRTH 

Arista 7. 8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 2 ; 
Class Debating Manager 5-7; Class Debating 
Team 4-8; T.A. Topics — Feature Editor 4 : 
Reporter 1-3, S-S ; Service Squad 5. 

Nothing outstanding about Julie — except his 
brains, looks and personality. As a charter mem- 
ber of the T.A. nature club he spent his lunch 
hours in the Botanical Gardens. He'll attend 
Y.U. as a stepping stone to medical school. 

".foy, temperance and repose. 

Slam the door on the doctor's nose." 

— Longfellow 



29- 



JACOB M. LEBOWITZ 

Arista S; Associate Photography Editor of 
Elchanite 7, 8; Vice-President of Math Club 
2; Library Squad 5, 6. 

Due to the fact that his father taught chemistry 
and physics, Jacob started out with a disadvantage 
— he didn't know "all" the answers. Jacob will 
study math in Y.U. next fall. 

After chemistry, Jacob took physics for relief. 



MITCHELL LEIFER 

Elchanite Typing Squad 7, 8; Class Sanita- 
tion Manager 1; President of Math Club 8; 
Chief oi Library Squad 7, 8; Library Squad 
4-6. 

Mitch was Mr. Epstein's "favorite" librarian. He 
could have been found in the science lab between 
classes tinkering with electrical equipment. He 
will continue shocking the teachers at C.C.N.Y., 
where he will take up electrical engineering. 

"What Art was to the ancient world. 
Science is to the modern." 



SAMUEL W. LEVENSON 

Arista 8; Varsity Basketball 7, 8; Junior 
Varsity Basketball 5. 6; Class Athletic Man- 
ager 8 ; President of Stamp and Coin Club 7 ; 
Vice-President of French Club 5; Office 
Squad 6, 7. 

A transfer from Toras Chaim, "Healthy Sam" 
found it vet)- difficult to attend school because 
of his evening T.V. show. He plans to get the 
business (course) at C.C.N. Y. 



'He who laughs — lasts." 



Poole 



— 30 — 



RAPHAEL LEVINE 

Associate Business Manager of Elchanite 7. 
8; Class President 5; Class Secretary-Trea- 
surer 1, 3; Class Athletic Manager S ; Lieu- 
tenant of Service Squad 8. 

Raphey touches Rabbi Faivelson's heart every day 
— with an ad-blank. All around he's a nice 
quiet guy, always minding his own business (T.A. 
Publications). In the fall Raphey will start work- 
ing for his M.D. at Y.U. 



'A good 


reputation 


is 


more 


valuable than 


money." 








— Syrtis 



RONALD MEYERS 

Class Debating Team 5-8; Class Sanitation 
Manager 1, 2; T.A. Topics — Reporter 6-8; 
Service Squad 5-8; Library Squad 7, 8. 

Ronnie could usually be seen coming to school 
chatting with Rabbi Zuroff. He has been a great 
aid to his class in intramural sports, and as the 
Softball pitcher of his class team, has won many 
a game. 

"It is a happy lot which finds no enemies." 




JOSEPH MIGHAELIS 

Kolenu Board 7, 8 ; Captain of School Soccer 
Team 3, 4; Lab .4ssistant 7. 

Coming to T.A. from Israel, Chanan had to cope 
with the difficulty of a foreign language. He 
wasn't long in overcoming this, however, and 
was soon one of the "boys" — his arguments with 
Kenny (i.e. Rabbi Kanotopsky) increasing in 
vigor from day to day. He left us in February 
and is now enrolled at State University (N.Y.). 

"Glorv is departed from Israel and came to 
T.A. . . ." 

— partly from the Bible 




•31 



JACK POLINSKY 

Co-Captain of Varsity Basketball Team 7, 8; 
Varsity Basketball 5-8; Class Athletic Man- 
ager 7, 8. 

Jackie, who transferred from Jefferson, soon be- 
came one of Rabbi Drillman's "favorite" students 
and the star of his class basketball team, as well 
as the school's. A double for Jeff Chandler, Jackie 
expects to attend Brooklyn College and major in 
business. 



"Bright star.' 



Keats 




HERMAN POLLOCK 

Elchanite Typing Squad 7, 8; Class Sanitation 
Manager 4; T.A. Topics — Reporter 7; Pre- 
sident of Spanish Club 4; Chairman of Char- 
ity Drive 8; Service Squad 7. 8; Library 
Squad 7, 8; Office Squad 6, 8. 

"Polly," who has an affinity of adding new words 
to the dictionary, also got himself into a friendly 
feud with Mr. Strum. As the Charge d' Affaires 
of the school charity drive, "Polly" has done a 
eery creditable job of collecting the money and 
keeping each class' record. 

"Every charitable act is a stepping stone to- 
icHird heaven." 

— Beecher 





ERVIN PREIS 

Class President 8; President of Hebrew 
Culture Club 7; Math Club 8; Hebrew Cul- 
ture Club 6, 7. 

Ervin is our ambassador from England, and a 
"priceless" one he is. Quiet, bright and sincere, 
he'll go far (all the way back to Manchester.'). 



"Oh to be in England, 
Now that April's there.' 



— Browning 




•32- 




HERBERT ROTHMAN 

Associate Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 
8; Elchanite Typist 7, 8; T.A. Publications 
1, 2; Service Squad 7, 8; Library Squad 5-8; 
Office Squad 5, 6, 8. 

As star performer of the office squad, "Hoibv" 
came to be known as the S.C.C. (sandwich, coffee 
and cake) man. History VII was a whiz to him 
via Havanas. Our errand boy intends to apply 
his business acumen at C.C.N.Y. 

Each season ended with a sigh, 
'Wait 'till next year was Herbie's cry. 



ARTHUR ROZMAN 

Elchanite Art Squad 4; Class Treasurer 1; 
Class Secretary-Treasurer 2. 4; Class Debat- 
ing Manager 3-5; Class Debating Team 1-6; 
T.A. Topics — News Editor 5: Reporter 4, 8, 
Library Squad 4, 8; School Band 6, 7. 

Artie vied for and won the "Absent Most" prize. 
He is all here, however, when it comes to dis- 
cussing his future medical career. 



'To be or not to be" 



. in class 
Apologies to "Willie' 




ABBA RUBINS 

T.A. Topics — Reporter 3; Zionism Club 
4-6; French Club 2; Hebrew Club 1. 

Abbey completes the Bensonhurst triumvirate of 
Fuchs, Kurtz, and Rubins. He plans to 
attend Rutgers Agricultural School and gain 
e.xperience on the Bnei Akiva farm to prepare 
for his farming career in Israel. 



'Behold he is the toiling man." 



— • Mark ham 



— 33 — 




REUBEN RUDMAN 

Chess and Checker Club 6, 7 ; Math Club 8; 
Tropical Fish Club 3-5; Service Squad 3. 

Reuben was one of the few, select members of 
the "I don't give a rap" club, but under the con- 
stant prodding of Mr. Lilker, was finally per- 
suaded that good marks are better than good naps. 
This fall he wUl transfer his new found philo- 
sophy to the classrooms of Y.U. 

"Blessing on him that first invented sleep." 

— Cervantes 




MICHAEL SALZMAN 

Associate Activities Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; 
Glee Club 7 ; Math Club 3, 5; Service Squad 

7. 

When Mickey came to us from the Yeshiva of 
Brighton, the word "deported" was printed on 
his record. He can render a really "solid" imi- 
tation of "Mighty Moe." He anticipates studying 
Chemical Engineering at Cooper Union. 

"Knowledge is wore than equivalent to force." 

— Johnson 




ALLAN J. SCHER 

Arista 8, Activities Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; 
Elchanite Typist 8; Class President 1, 3; 
Class Vice-President 2; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 6; Class Debating Team 1-4. 6, 8; 
T.A. Topics—Co-Editor 3,5: Elchanite Re- 
porter 1, 2, 4, 6 ; Secretary 2 ; Service Squad 6. 

Al, our red-headed poet, has continually amazed 
us with his production of poems of fine quality. 
A true Romanticist, he also set a record for serv- 
ice to the school, proving that he is also active 
in school (as well as out). 

A poetical medical he will be, 

He'll cure your ills, with poetry free. 



— 34 — 



STANLEY SCHIMMEL 

Arista 8; Associate Activities Editor of El- 
chanite 7, S; School Debating Team 5, 8; 
School Athletic Manager 8; Manager of Var- 
sity Basketball Team 7 ; Class President 5; 
Class Debating Manager 3, 6, 7 ; Class Debat- 
ing Team 1-8; Class Athletic Manager 4; 
T.A. Topics — Sports Editor 3: Reporter 2, 
1-6. 

As the No. 1 ""Volunteer for Stevenson," 
""Schmoo" was the governor's personal campaign 
manager in the school during the '52 elections. 
As a debater and orator he has helped his class 
win many a debate. During his term as athletic 
manager, Yeshiva history was set when the school 
basketball team culminated its season in Madison 
Square Garden. 

"There is no power like that of oratory." 

— Clay. 







LARRY SCHINDLER 

President of Chess and Checker Club 3; 
Chess and Checker Club 3, 7 ; Math Club 4-6; 
Seri'ice Squad 8. 

Thanks to being one of Rabbi Herskovics' fa- 
mous "one hundred percent boys," Larry's average 
in T.A. rose with every term. His principal in- 
terests lay in Mr. Epstein's math classes. As 
much as he liked that subject, however, he will 
apply his mind to pre-law at Y.U. 

He explored the unknown — in his science 
fiction stories. 



HARVEY SGHNEIER 

T.A. Publications 1, 2; School Chess Team 
1, 2; School Checker Team 7 ; Class Athletic 
Manager 7 ; Service Squad 7. 

Harv first heard about crossword puzzles in T.A. 
and worked on them between "laff and learn" 
sessions in Rabbi Karlin's class. In the fall, he 
will continue his studies (both secular and cross- 
word) at Y.U. 

"Better a diamond with a flaw, than a pebble 
without." 

— Confucius 




■35 — 



ZALMAN SGHRADER 

Vice-Leader of Arista 7; Arista 6-8; Stu- 
dent Court 7, 8; Elchanite Typist 6-8; Class 
President 2, 6; Class Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Class Athletic Manager 3; Captain of School 
Chess Team 5. 

Zal became a member of the I.S.M.L.U. (Inter- 
national Sunday Morning Latecomers Union) 
against his will. He was the Chopin of the school 
band (Knabe used exclusively). His favorite 
pastime is listening to a poetic rendition of the 
"Mountain Whippoorwill" (as Mr. Strum found 
out). 

School was one big symphony to him. 



ARTHUR SCHRANK 

Vice-President of Spanish Club 5; Secretary 
of Stamp and Coin Club 2 ; Chess and Check- 
er Club 4; Service Squad 7. 

After four years of practice and research in T.A., 
Arthur will probably become a special adviser on 
microfilm to the F.B.I. A strict observer of the 
Sunday "blue law," he found it impossible to 
attend school on Sundays. 



'Absence makes the heart grow fonder." 




Bayly 




IRVING SCHWARTZ 

Associate Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 
8; Varsity Basketball 5-8; Junior Varsity 
Basketball 3, 4; Class President 4; Class 
Vice-President 5; Class Athletic Manager 
1-3. 




While not being the outstanding one in class 
pranks, "Itzy" worked behind the scenes. As a 
good all-around athlete, our "Rabbi Schwartz" 
has been a member of the basketball team for 
two years and has been a great help to his class 
in all intramural sport events. 

'The cause is hidden, but the result is known." 

— Ovid 




■36 



w. ^^ ^ 








HARVEY SHAPIRO 

T.A. Publications 1; School Debating Team 
7 ; Class President 6; Class Debating Team 
3-5, 7, 8; President of Spanish Club 5; Ser- 
vice Suuad 7. 

"Shippy," who has been a member of his class 
debating team, seemed to get strange sensations 
upon hearing Mr. Strum read poetry. Known as 
the "Chassid of Crown Heights," he expeas to 
attend Yeshiva Universit)- and continue learning 
Talmud. 

"No man has ever prayed heartily without 
learning so m eth ing." 

— Emerson, 



IVAN SERCHUK 

Associate Art Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; El- 
chanite Typist 7, 8; School Debating Team 8; 
School Athletic Manager 7; Varsity Basket- 
ball 5-8; Junior Varsity Basketball 3, 4; Class 
Vice-President 1; Class Debating Team 8; 
Class Athletic Manager 3; Service Squad 8. 

Realizing the need for a change in T.A. sports 
policy, (foreign and domestic), "Ike" got himself 
elected Athletic Manager on the G.O.P. (Get into 
Office Patrol) ticket. He kept tabs on all the 
teachers with that "Old Guard" vigil. He hopes 
someday to become a lawyer and dabble in politics. 

'7 a^ree with no man's opinion, 
1 h.ave some of my own." 

— Ivan Sergyevich Turgeniev 




MOSES SILBERBERG 

T.A. Topics — Reporter 7; Hebrew Culture 
Club 8. 

"Moe," an avid soccer fan, never could impress 
upon the administration the importance of a 
soccer team. After making high school in three 
years, he will take pre-med in college. He aspires 
to be a doctor in Israel. 

'\4ct well your part, there all ihc honor lies." 

— Pope 



— 37 — 





JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN 

Arista Leader 7; Arista 5-8; Arista Sec- 
retary 6; Student Court 7 ; Activities Editor 
of Elchanite 7, 8; Editor of Kolenu 
6; Co-Editor of Kolenu 7, 8; T.A. Pub- 
lications 1, 2; Class President 4; Class 
Debating Team 5; President of Math Club 3. 

Joe is known to all as Goldman's other self. Well 
liked by all, he went about his business and ob- 
served all about him in a quiet sort of way. 
Hoping someday to contribute something revolu- 
tionary to mankind, Joe will center his further 
education around a study of physics. 

"/ perceive well by certain evidences thine 
ability to learn sciences." 

— Chaucer 



ROBERT SIMON 

T.A. Topics — Reporter 7, 8; Science Club 
5, 6; Service Sguad 8; Library Squad 7, 8. 

No square he, Bobby has an angle all his own on 
life, so he will become an engineer. He just man- 
aged to keep out of Mr. Epstein's hair because . . . 

Hard to anger, quick to appease, 
Bobby s gut what it takes to please. 





NORMAN R. SINOWITZ 

Class President 4; Math Club 2-5, 7, 8; Span- 
ish Club 6. 

Normie, the apple of Mr. Epstein's eye (or so 
it 'pears), has a slight stroke of genius — for 
doing things differently. If he doesn't watch out, 
he'll end up as an actuary (at $50,000 a year). 

"Whoso would be a man, must be a noncon- 
formist." 

— Emerson 



— 38- 



JULIUS SOLOMON 

Arista 7, S; Student Court S ; Business Man- 
ager of Elchanite 7, S; Varsity Basketball 7 , 
8 ; Junior Varsity Basketball 5, 6; Class Pre- 
sident 6, 7; Class Secretary-Treasurer 5 ; 
Class Athletic Manager 4; President of 
French Club 4; Vice-President of French 
Club 5. 

Julie, the meistersinger of Rabbi Yogel's class, 
can reel off arias and operettas (telephone op- 
erettas, that is!!). His knack for basketball (he 
was SO on the Varsity!) and his great personality 
really set him above and apart. 

"And ever as he went, some merry lay he sung." 

— Beattie 



PHILIP SULTAN 

Secretary of Math Club 3; Music Club 4; 
French Club S, 6; Glee Club 7. 
The Vaughn Monroe of T.A., Phil charmed us 
with his velvet voice. He is one of these rare 
people whom everyone likes. 

"With a song in his heart." 



WALTER SUSSMAN 

Arista 6-8; Elchanite Photography Squad 7, 
8; Class President 2, .5; Class Vice-President 
3, 4; Class Debating Team 3, 6-8; T.A. Topics 
— Feature Editor 7: Reporter 3-6: Secretary 
3, 4. 

"Average Walt" participated in nearly all the acti- 
vities possible in his four years in T.A. If the 
average average would be as high as Walt's ave- 
rage, the average average would be much higher. 



The original "Ladies 



Home Companion" 
CNuff said.'!) 



39- 




HAROLD UDEWITZ 

Activities Editor of Elchanite 7, S; Elchanite 
Art Squad 6; Class Sanitation Manager 8; 
T.A. Topics — Reporter 5: Secretary S 

Considered b\- his classmates the greatest im- 
personator and comedian in the country, "Udey" 
has been a major attraction at every school func- 
tion. Not only does he have great talent for the 
stage, but he is also considered one of the best 
artists ever to be graduated from our school. 

All the world's a stage, 

And all the men and women merely mimick- 
ers' material." 

— lifted from Shakespeare 

STUART WALTZMAN 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 6; Class Debating 
Team 7 ; T.A. Topics — Reporter 3, 4; Pre- 
sident of Spanish Club 1; Service Squad 7 ; 
Office Squad 6-8. 

"Stuie", whose name can always be found on the 
"Summa Cum Laude" honor roll, had been one 
of Senor Cantor's most beloved Spanish students. 
Being extremel}' interested in science, he intends 
to take a pre-Medical course in Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

"In the scale of the destines, brawn will never 
weigh so much as brain," 

Lowell 



DAVID WEISS 

Class Athletic Manager 3, 5; Hebrew Club 
1, 2; Math Club 3, 4; Chess and Checker 
Club 7. 

Davey is a fast man on the cinders (and at socials 
too). He kept us in stitches with his modernistic 
interpretations of native dances. 

"Be merry and be Weiss." 

Stolen from D'Averant 



LOUIS V/OHL 

Producer of Variety Night 8; Class Debating 
Team 7, 8; Glee Club Leader 7 ; Service 
Squad 7, 8; Library Squad 3-6; Office Squad 
7, 8. 

Lou, a gift from Uptown and California, made 
himself welcome as soon as he came. Aside from 
organizing and leading the Glee Club, he was 
instrumental in producing Variety Night. In the 
fall he will start preparations for the Bar. 

It didn't take long to see through Lou, 
To find a guy nicer is hard to do. 
There aren't many — one of a few, 
All that he wants is friendship from you. 

— 40 — 






o 



[> LEDINE 



I^iatif 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Dear Diary — Today I enter a new school. I am 
looking forward to a gigantic school, tremendous 
gym, and a big pool . . . Well, two backboards for 
basketball is nothing to sneeze at, is it??? . . . 
Mr. Kallner (T.A.'s gift to the world of science — 
all wrapped up in himself) takes us deeper, deeper 
into test tubes and beakers. Makes us see "stars' and 
a moon on his nose. Remember the loyalty oath that 
had to be signed? . . . Mr. Gold, our English teacher, 
has an interesting way of giving homework assign- 
ments — makes you write things in the margin. 
(You write so much in the margin that it's im- 
possible to fit anything else onto the page) . . . 
Attention all. Senor Cantor is coming to town with 
a fixed wagon, red ink, marked papers (after 4 
months) and all. But Senor, the Regents is 3 years 
away. — Who asked you to talk there? . . . New 
Hebrew teacher says — you will be coming begging 
to me for those few extra points when you grad- 
uate. It won't help you even if you bring your 
fazer, your mozer, your sister or your brozer (that's 
a song, isn't it?) . . . Music can't be short and 
sweet so we write ten pages for Mr. Grossman on 
the final — Boy, that ought to bust his (Musical) 
scale . . . French professor has nothing but "good 
will' for "fine boys' ... A certain Rebby teaches with 
the fluid touch — free showers for the boys in the 
first three rows . . . Hershki misses rebby San- 
ders with a Pepsi-Cola bottle. Boys increase acci- 
dent insurance coverage for fear of being hit b\ 
balls, books, and other flying missiles . . . Rabbi 
H. also goes on an undercover investigation (tzitzis 
inspection . . . Faivy takes to teaching gemmorrah, 
class forges ahead at the rate of two lines per 
day between rest periods . . . 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Upon returning from our vacations, we have the 
big three for Math (Morantz, Branson and Rosen- 
thal). You can't tell the math teachers without a 
scorecard. Guess we'll just have to live thru it . . . 
We have an old fossil teaching us Bologee — 
what do the oysters do down in the mud? — wah 
— ■ they make whoopee . . . Mr. Landowne — 
"What's the difference between a chicken and a roos- 
ter?" Feit — ""a rooster has feathers ..." (Oh 
Footsie, how could you) . . . Julie teaches us a meth- 
od for fooling the Board of Regents — If ye don't 
know the answer, write "therefore' and I'll give you 
half credit . . . Rabbi Hershkovics (with a wee) 
makes us give $1.25 for packages for poor relatives 
in far off lands — you will pay your "bock' or you 
vill fail. Rothman asks for a receipt for his money 
and fails half (you think I rob you?) . . . Doc 
tells of his adventures at the Indian reservation. 
Dearie enjoyed the 'bays' there too . . . The poor 
doctor laments to us, ""I missed Rocca last night. 
Dearie wasn't home to turn on the TV set" . . . 
Smilin Phil (Julie's protegee) teaches us the facts 
of life — his face gets red enough to learn the 
biological makeup of a tomato . . . Tex Shapiro 
— T. A.'s answer to Roy Rogers (the glitzianah 
cowboy) makes everyone use their imaginations. 
Weel, this circle isn't exactly a square, but I'm not 
here to teach you, go home and read the book . . . 
Radio brought into Spanish class — but have no 
fear — the Senor is wise to the racket and will 
get to the bottom of it . . . Boys learn to wrestle 
with Talmud as Shanghai Shark takes on all comers. 
The Rabbi takes down names and numbers in a 
little black book made of (you guessed it) shark- 
skin . . . Rabbi Karlin penalizes bo)^. I am taking 
a quarter of one second off recess, and he does. 




JUNIOR YEAR 

Mr. Turetzky (a combination of math, gemorrah 
niguns, and a Broolkyn accent) complains that the 
boys are not loining their work . . . The period 
ends at 5:28 — Moe enters at 5:25 — 'you're 
wasitng you own time boys' . . . Dr. Kronenberg 
takes over the Spanish class and tells us how he 
gives dictation. He says, "you know I vill beng 
wiz my hent on zee desk ever) time der ees a 
writteren accent on de void - yah, yah" (who said 
nein.') . . . New subject, chemstiry. Q. "What's 
the formula for dog's urine?" A. "K9P . . . How 
can }0u be such a cluck and live . . . Reb Faivel- 
son's map business (5c map, transported from the 
East Side at great expense for only 35c) merrily 
rolls along . . . He deducts points from those stu- 
dents with NPA's (not purchasing anything) . . . 

Student — "Who wrote "The Fat of the Land'?" 

Doc — • "Yeziersky" 

Student — How do you spell that?" 

Doc — "Y ... E ... I can't tell you sonny ..." 
Mart)- (collapsible knees) teaches us about the 
alliances before the first World War — If Russia 
attacks Germany, etc. . . . We meet and discuss 
Lincoln Steffens in this manner — Teacher (?) 
"■Was Lincoln right in going to Heidelberg?" let's 
vote. Semar, vou count the \otes . . . Into the 
stretch before Regents week — "But Mr. Lebowitz 
we didn't learn sulphur yet?? Shut up, we still have 
plenty of time . . . 

SENIOR 

"Well, here we are, we finally made it — the 

big shots in the school . . . New Hebrew teacher, 

^gbbi Perlman, quickly endeared' Hffftseit "^^t^^Wl^ 

dents. This \ers.itile rebb\ goes from~carnEf2^TO 



r 

J cabbalah to Korbon without even pausing for a 
breath, but he can still hear the bell — Yep . . . 
Mr. Lilker teaches us all about the yuneeyons in 
America . . . New social studies teacher, Mr. Melov 
(Ipana smile and all) ""Well, they did it." Ask 
questions, he says, so like suckers we ask him. The 
result — "Nonesense, Schissel — zero" . . . His 
slogan — zeros with a smile . . . English 7 — a 
real relaxing course. Stevenson, oops. Strum gives 
his rendition of the Mountain 'Wippoorwill (Up in 
the mountains it's lonesome all the time) What a 
ham: Ham? No. ham . . . Physics is one big laugh 
as one experiment after another bites the dust. As 
soon as I disconnect the current from this electro- 
magnet, the bar drops of." Drop off — darn you. 
Epidemic of cigarette cough hits school. Rabbi Yogel 
also suggests taking up periodic collections for those 
bovs who wear "Ahzinih Hoizen" and Zulu hetz in 
Jimmy from Harlem style . . . Botknecht breaks prece- 
dent by serving for two terms as G.O. prexy . . . 
We read Macbeth in English class — "go get him, 
surgeons" — "'send out moe, hoses" — '"Where's 
Beckman????" Solid is given for first time in school. 
If you have a line perpendicular to, Solomon, Brump, 
and parallel to, Brump, Fisher. Might) Moe gets 
over his period of mourning and lifts his pants 
from their half-mast position . . . VCTiy was Wilson 
sick? Adler asks — Melov wipes awa) tears and 
argues against dictators . . . And then — Regents 
scholarship. College Boards, Finals and Regents, and 
GRADUATION . . . And so — Dear Diary, It 
actually was a short jump from freshie to senior 
and we enjoyed every half-second of it. And so 
now we wish to thank the administration and faculty 
for making our high-school education such a pleas- 
ant experience. 

Yours very truh. 

The graduating class of 1953 




HILL OF FAME 



1) Best Dressed _ — — - — — PAUL KOLKER 

2) Best Natured — — — — — CHARLES CUTTER 

3) Class Artist ___ — — — GIL GOLDFINE 

4) Class Athlete — — — — — BARRY HOCHDORF 

5) Class Casanova — — — — MARTIN ASKOWITZ 

6) Class Humorist — — — — — HAROLD UDEWITZ 

7) Class Orator — — — — — — PHILIP FELIG 

8) Class Poet — _ — _ — — ALLAN SCHER 

9) Class Talmudist _ — — — — JULIUS SOLOMON 

10) Class Writer — — — — — LARRY SCHINDLER 

11) Did Most for the School — — MICHA BOTKNECHT 

12) Most Conscientious — — — JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN 

13) Most Intelligent — — _ _ LIONEL GROSSBARD 

14) Most Likely to Succeed — — LIONEL GROSSBARD 

15) Most Popular —___ — — GIL GOLDFINE 

16) Favorite Teacher — — — — MR. MARTIN LILKER 

17) Favorite Subject —___ — — HISTORY 




-46- 




g.o. 



FALL TERM 



G.O. Administration (Fall 
Term): Sitting, left-right: G. 
Goldfine, Vice-Pres.; M. 
Botknecht, Pres. Standing: 
S. Feder, Sec'y-Treas. 




G. O. (Fall Term); Front row, left-right; S. Miller, 
M. Polansky, M. Gordon, H. Book; Second row. 
left-right: M. Goldsmith, H. Kriegsman, S. Feder, M. 
Botknecht, G. Goldfine, I. Serchuk; Third row left- 
riaht; N. Gordon, R. Hirt, M. Kriger, H. Josepher, 
P/Felig, I. Blau, B. Hochdorf; Fourth Row, left-right; 
I. Bruckenstein, I. Neugeboren, D. Levine, L. Rubin, 
S. Fleisher, A. Cohen, H. Levine. 










vi 



l„^^^ 



^.0. 



SPRING TERM 



Our student organization known 
familiarly as the CO., and in 
which all the classes are equally re- 
presented, has done an excellent job 
this past year. As coordinator of 
the numerous extra-curricular act- 
ivities of the school, it has contin- 
ually spurred on the student body 
to participate in as many activities 
as possible to further both them- 
selves and the school. 

In line with constant efforts to 
explain the duties of the G.O. in 
relation to the student body, a 
copy of the G.O. constitution has 
been distributed to all the students. 
A tour around the school and 
grounds has been initiated for the 
new students. 



G. O. Administration 
(Spring Term): Sit- 
ting, left-right: M. 
Botknecht. Pres.; H. 
Kriegsman, Vice-Pren. 
Standing, P. Kolker, 
Sec'y-Treas. 




G. O. (Spring Term); Front row, left-right: A. Gafni, 
A. Dershowitz, P. Kolker, M. Botknecht, H. Kriegsman, 
I. Welield, M. Polansky, B. Langenauer, Second row, left- 
right: A. Eidelman, H. Elstein, M. Ganchrow, E. Preis, 
M". Askowitz, P. Rosenfeld, S. Miller; Third Row, left- 
right: A. Kirschbaum, S. Waitzman, A. Cohen, E. 
Beckman. L. Indyk, E. Lazar. N. Bryks. 




^tuifeht CouH 



FALL TERM 

The object of the Student Court, the judiciary branch of the GO, is 
to make the students more aware of rules and regulations which they 
must abide by throughout the school day. 

The court is composed of six members (five regulars and one alternate) 
chosen from Arista. Procedure of trial is as follows: When a student 
commits a misdemeanor, a member of the Service Squad serves him 
with a summons stating the time, place, and nature of the act. At the 
court session the Service Squad member who reported the defendant 
brings him up and acts as prosecuting attorney. After the summons 
is read by one of the court members the questioning period commences, 
during which the justices become more acquainted with the case, and 
the student may speak in his defence. When the questioning is over, 
both the defendant and prosecutor leave, and the justices discuss the 
case among themselves and with Mr. Strum. In doing so, two points 
are especially considered : the seriousness of the crime and the student's 
past record. 

After the court has reached a decision the defendant is returned, and 
either acquitted or informed of some duty he must perform in con- 
sequence of his crime. These duties are either in service to the school, 
such as sanitation work or personal punishment such as detention. 

By means of formal procedure followed at the trials and able en- 
couragement from Mr. Strum, the Student Court has improved many 
students — socially. 




STUDENT COURT (Fall Term): Sitting, left-right: Z. Schroder, J. Sil- 
verstein, M. Goldman, P. Felig, M. Botknecht, M. Adler; Standing, left- 
rinht G. Goldfine, E. Glick. 





^tu4eht Couft 



SPRING TERM 



A FUTURE CASE FOR 
STUDENT COURT: 
lelt ^ right; E. Glick, I 
Schwartz, D. Baker, M. 
Goldman. 




STUDENT COURT (Spring Term): Sitting, left-right; 
C.Genn, S. Cohen, L. Grossbard, Z. Schroder, J. Solo- 
mon, M. Botknecht, P. Kolker; Standing; H. Kriegsman. 



V * 




jfiHMa 



FALL TERM 



/lEISTA LEADERS (Fall 
Term); left-right: Z. Sch- 
rader, J. Silverstein. L. 
Grossbard. 



It is always a great honor for a 
student to be accepted as a member 
of T. A. Arista, the school's honor 
society, and to wear its familiar pin. 
This year a few changes have been 
made in the requirements for mem- 
bership and new application forms 
have been printed. A committee has 
also been appointed to draw up a re- 
vised edition of the constitution and 
to submit it to the assembly for its 
approval. Mr. Lebowitz, Arista faculty 
adviser, offers many fine suggestions 
as to procedure and legislation. 



ARISTA (Fall Term): Seated left-right; M. Katz, I. 
Fischer, L. Grossbard, J. Silverstein, Z. Schrader, S. 
Cohen, M. Goldman. Standing left-right; S. Kwestel, 
L. Indyk, J. Fuchs, J. Landwirth, P. Kolker, M. Adler, 
W. Sussman, P. Felig, N. Gordon, M. Tokayer. 




/In Ma 



SPRING TERM 



Every term Arista plans an outing 
or trip for its members. In the fall 
term (1952-1953) the Broadway hit 
"The King and I" was seen, and a 
good time was enjoyed by all. 

One of the most important of Arista 
activities is aiding students who are 
deficient in certain subjects. By doing 
this. Arista lives up to its dual name 
of excellence in both service and schol- 
arship. 



ARISTA LEADERS 
left-right: L. Grossbard, 
P. Felig, M. Goldman. 




ARISTA: Front row, left-right: J. Fuchs. S. Cohen, P. 
Kolker. M. Goldman, P. Felig, L. Grossbard, J. Lebowitz. 
Z. Schroder, S. Schimmel; Second row; W. Sussman, 
M. Adier, S. Feder, J. Solomon, J. Landwirth, J. Fischer, 
H. Fleischer, S. Kweslel, N. Bryks; Third row; M. To- 
kayer, J. Silverstein, N. Gordon, S. Levenson, L. Indyk, 
A. Scher, M. Katz. 




In the firm belief that the best school government is 
government by the students themselves, the administration 
of the school has encouraged the pupils to set up their own 
Service Squad. Adhering to this principle, the Service Squad 
has grown and grown until it has now reached its present 
proportions. Quite naturally the students respect this select 
body and consider it a great privilege to be a member of it. 
.This past term, in keeping with the democratic ideals, 
the Service Squad has instituted a newer and better policy 
of selecting the members of the "Squad." In the past the 
officers of the GO picked all the candidates. Now the pro- 
cedure has been changed so that the students themselves 
pick the majority of the members. Thus the students are 
supervised by the people of their choice. 

While saluting the organization, we dare not forget to 
commend its Captain Coleman Genn, who has done a most 
admirable job. Taking an objective view, we sincerely feel 
that this body has done much to improve our school, and 
we take pride in saying it. 



^eti)ice ^((ua4 



FALL TERM 



SERVICE SQUAD (Fall Term); Front row, left-right: M. Berlin, M. Ganchrow, 
S. Waltzman, E. Glick, G. Goldfine, B. Hochdori, D. Levine, M. Edelman, R. 
Brenner; Second row, M. Tokayer, J. Becker, R. Meyers, H. Shapiro, D. 
Baker, H. Schneier, M. Salzman, H. Bursky, R. Spiegel, H. Kriegsman, S. 
Hymowitz, C. Cutter, M. Katz; Third row, H. Pollock, M. Bluth, M. Green- 
span, E. Herschman, D. Fuchs, L. Wohl, C. Genn, A. Schrank, M. Gold- 
man, P. Banner, H. Rothman. 




^etiJice ^quad 



SPRING TERM 



Left-right: C. Genn, H. Kriega 
man, G. Gold&ne, E. Glick. 




SERVICE SQUAD (Spring Term); Front row, left-right: G. Falk, M. Zall, H. 
Rofhman, C. Genn, H. Kriegsman, R. Levine, M. Freiman, I. Serchuk, H. 
Pollock; Second row, left-right: M. Askowitz, J. Neugeboren, D. Levine, A, 
Eidelman, H. Bursky, B. Hochdorf, L. Schindler, J. Becker, S. Nadel, S. Gold- 
stein; Third row, left-right: H. Levine, S. Wilon, S. Chwat, R. Simon, L. 
Wohl, M. Edelstein, J. Greenfield, G. Goldfine, E. Beckman. 



jT^ M»k 



f^ f) ,a -a' 




Among the long list of -groups and societies of 
which our school is proud of, the debating team 
stands foremost. It is comprised of those students 
who are exceptionally talented with the gift of 
eloquence. This society partakes in debates with 
the various private and public high schools of 
this city, and often, we proudly say, comes out 
the victor. 

Debating in TA is not limited to only inter- 
school debating, but rather includes inter-class 
oratory. According to the present system every 
class has its own debating team led by its debating 
manager, and debates approximately every other 
week. As the general supervisor of this and the 
school debating team, we have a school debating 
manager who is elected by the school at large each 
term. He is considered an important member of 
the administration and does much to promote 
interest in debating among the whole student body. 

On special occasions assemblies are held at 'wiiicli 
the pupils act as judges of the debate, and are 
permitted a questioning period afterwards. The 
students appreciate this and look forward for 
more of these gatherings. 



t^el^atin^ ^ccietif 



FALL TERM 



DEBATING TEAM (Fall Term); Silting, left-rignt: S. Schimmel. S. Cohen, P. 
Felig, H. Zuckerberg; Standing, left-right: G. Blidstein, L. Indyk, A. Der- 
showiiz, N. Gordon. 









SPRING TERM 



H 



DEBATING TEAM ACTION; 
Left-right: N. Gordon, S. 
Cohen, I. Serchuk. 



:i.jmiii 




DEBATING TEAM (Spring Term); Sitting, left-right: G. Blidstein, S. Cohen, 
I. Serchuk, S. Schimmel; Standing, left-right: M. Ganchrow, A. Dershowitz. 
N. Gordon, J. Fischer, P. Felig. 




"The true University of these days is a collection of books." 
These words, written by Thomas Carlyle more than a decade 
ago, still hold true today. That is why we are proud to have 
a library with as diversified a collection of books as we have. 
During the past year one hundred new books were purchased, 
ranging from best-selling novels to history, reference, and non- 
fiction books. Its periodical section deserves exceptional credit be- 
cause of its subscriptions to many magazines and pamphlets. The 
school library is a member of the Book of the Month Club and 
the History Book of The Month Club, receiving reading material 
every month. Our school library also has a section devoted 
to Hebrew literature and history, which is used by quite a num- 
ber of students. 

The library staff consists of eighteen librarians. At least 
two members of the staff are in the library each period. The 
library is open during the lunch hour as well as during the 
entire school day. The staff is ably headed by our faculty 
adviser Mr. B. Brender. Mitchell Leifer is chief librarian. 
A complete up-to-date catalogue section has been perfected 
by the library staff under the supervision of Messrs. Brender 
and Leifer. 



FALL TERM 



LIBRARY (Fall Term): Sitting, left-right: M. Goldberg, Mr. B. Brender, M. 
Leifer, H. Pollock; Second row, left-right; D. Kolatch, S. Richter, R. Meyers, 
J. Becker, L. Richter, R. Klein; Third row, left-right H. Lumerman, D. Win- 
ter, S. Cliwat, R. Simon, J. Blazer. 




m 




LIBRARY SQUAD (Spring Term): Front row, left - right: I. Blazer, Mr. B. 
Brender, M. Leiier, L. Richter; Second row, H. Machlis, D. Kolatch, M. Gold- 
berg, R. Meyers, J. Becker, M. Edelstein, S. Chwat, S. Richter, L. Spector, 
E. Glick; Third row, left-right: S. Feder, B. Meyerson, J. Furmansky, R. 
Brenner, H. Pollock, M. Goldman, R. Simon, A. Rozman. 




SPRING TERM 



LIBRARY ACTION; lelt- 
:iaht: J. Blazer, R. Brenner. 





T. A. TOPICS; Sitting, left-right: P. Felig, M. Goldman; 
Standing, left-right: S. Chwat, C. Genn, S. Feder, W. 
Sussman. 



T. /i' Pul^licatm^ 



Kolenu 

Kolenu, this year, has continued to function as one of the few Hebrew 
Hterary magazines on the high-school level. Numerous articles of high 
merit are included, such as original interpretations of Talmudic passages. 
Martin Goldman and Levi Kurtz have done an excellent job as this year's 
editors. Rabbi Faivelson deserves much credit for the time and effort he 
has devoted to this publication. 

Elchanite 

This issue of Elchanite as well as all other preceding ones is the fruit 
of the efforts of an organization which works from the beginning of the 
year until the end. Meetings of the entire group are held once a week, 
when all problems are worked out jointly. By learning from past experi- 
ence, each Elchanite improves upon its predecessors and achieves more 
and more merit. 

TA Topics 

Probably the most familiar of the TA Publications to students is TA 
Topics, whose dual purpose it is to inform the students of school activities 
and entertain them with humorous columns. Members of the staff are 
chosen from the Journalism Club led by Mr. Sidney Gold. Recently the 
1 opics has reported on the student popularity poll and the TA basketball 
game in Madison Square Garden. 

The editors ol the Elchanite, '53, would like to take this 
opportunity to express their gratitude to the following mem- 
bers of the art and typing squads who have contributed so 
much to the success of this year's issue. 



ART SQUAD 

Aaron Cohen 
Arthur Friedman 
Eli Lazar 
David Levine 



TYPING SQUAD 
Morris Goldberg Mitchell Leifer 

Elias Heishman Herman Pollack 

Leonard Indyk Herbert Rothman 

Zalman Schrader 



7 /^. Puhlicatm^ 




ASSOCIATES OF THE ELCHANITE: S:lung, le:t-rign-, 
J. Lebowitz, I. Serchuk, M. Askowitz, Rabbi B. Faivel- 
son. P. relig, P. Kolker; Standing, left-rightM. Salz- 
man, H. Rothman. I. Schwartz, L. Indyk, R. Brenner, 
R. Levine. 



KOLENU: Sitting, left-right: I. Kurtz, J. Silverstein, Rabbi B. Faivelson, 
M. Goldman, N. Bryks; Standing, leit-ngh*. M. Botknecht, D. Baker. 



«fl 



1 



.^ 




'^t^ 



Mletia 



BASKETBALL TEAM CAP- 
TAINS; left-right; J. Polin- 
sky. B. Hochdorf. 




The most successful basketball team ever 
produced by Brooklyn Talmudical Academy 
took the floor last year. Under the coaching 
of Hal Jetter, the team won many a game in 
both the Jewish High School League and in 
non League play. Two school records were 
shattered during the '52-'53 season. The indi- 
vidual scoring record for one season was 
broken by Al Heifer who scored 384 points. 
The team broke another record by defeating 
an opposing team by 54 points, the largest 
margin in T.A. history. 



BASKETBALL TEAM (Spring Term): Front row, left-right: S. Horowitz, B. Hoch- 
dorf, J. Polinsky, A. Heifer, G. Goldfine; Second row, left-right: S. Schimmel, 
Dizengoff, R. Brenner, I. Serchuk, M. Hirschhorn, S. Hymowitz, J. Miller; 
Last row, left-right: J. Lloyd, L Schwartz, S. Levenson, J. Solomon, C. Genn. 




IM 




1-1- 






J.*' 


3^/^ 




f- 







I^^wft 



;'-'*v; 






'Swish" 



tliaM'AoH ^ifuate ^af4eH 



This March 25 marked the high water mark 
in T.A. Brooklyn basketball history. On that 
night, the championship of the Yeshiva 
Basketball League was decided in a game at 
Madison Square Garden. This was the first 
time that any Yeshiva was able to play in an 
arena of this size. The game was played as 
the preliminary to a New York Knickerbocker 
Boston Celtic game. 

The opposition was furnished by our bro- 
thers and rivals of T.A. Uptown. The game 
was thrilling throughout and was played well. 
Although we lost 52 - 46, a good time was had 
by all. 




J^HtM-Httifa/ 



During the last year many new additions were made in the school regarding 
intramural events. Basketball, punchball and foul shooting tournaments were 
held during both terms as well as ping-pong, handball and Softball tournaments 
during the spring term. The basketball tournaments were held after school and 
the ping-pong tournaments and foul-shooting tournaments were held during 
lunch hour in the school gym. The Softball and handball tournaments were held 
on Friday afternoons at Softball courts in city parks. 












V 




INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL (Fall Term); Front row, lelt- 
right: S. Cohen, G. Goldline, J. Polinsky, L Serchuk, R. Bren- 
ner; Second row, left-right: H. Kriegsman. M. Greenspan, J. 
Solomon, C. Genn. 



j^Htta-titutai 




INTRAMUARL BASKETBALL (Spring Term); Front rov,-, left- 
right: S. Cohen, L Serchuk. H. Hoifman, A. Heller, N. Gor- 
don; Second row, left-right: Z. Schroder, J. Becker, H. Kriegs- 
man, S. Waltzman, B. Hochdorf. 





CO-OP; Left-right M. Botknecht, S. 
Feder, M. Ganchrow, S. Socol. 



Cc-ci2 ^tcte 



A recent development, the Brooklyn T. A. 
Cooperative store, was founded and subsidized 
by the G. O. at the onset of the fall term. Be- 
cause of its excellent management, it has al- 
ready proven successful, although its merchan- 
dise is sold to the students at a reduced price. 




"A Student's Life" 

Eavesdropping upon a group of prospective freshmen, the 
"Elchanite" editors were impressed with the fact that Tahnudi- 
cal Academy is actually a mystery to those who are about to en- 
ter its sacred halls of study. As soon as a boy becomes a member 
of the student body, his daily life begins to take on a particular 
shape and pattern. Because we wish all who are still strangers 
to us to become better acquainted with our daily schedule, and 
because we feel that a glimpse upon a typical day of a T. A. 
student would bring back happy memories of many such 
days, we present here a photographic essay depicting "one stu- 
dent's day." 




PREDAWN VIEW of 
typical T.A. student, 
Walter Sussman. 





THE T.A. LIBRARY provides a source of refer 
ence for teachers and students alike. Here, Walt 
is making some final notes before his classes begin. 



COMMENCING THE DAY with 
.he ritual of the "Tephillin," a 
natural in every T.A. boy's life. 




A HEARTY BREAKFAST means 
getting the day off to a good start. 




BEFORE THE START of the day, Wa; 
stops in for an informal chat with the scho, 
administrator, Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroi 




IN THE SCIENCE LABORA. 
TORY, personal observation is 
necessary to confirm theories gleaned 
from notes. -^ 




A COUPLE OF CLASSMATES, 
Gil Goldfine and Louis Wohl, 
join Sussman in checking some 
vital information. ->• 



READY, will- 
ing, and able, 
our subject is on 
the job. -*■ 




STUDY PERIOD. A difficult portion 
of Geworrah absorbs all of a student's 



CHANNUKAH; the eldest son 
of the Sussman household lights 
the traditional candles. 



/l^tef Behcet 



JLyESPITE the long hours and rigorous 
schedule, T.A. boys do have time to relax. 
A happy homelife, a healthy social life, and 
planned study hours fill the evening for our 
students. Religious observance is part and 
parcel of every boy's life. On these pages we 
see Walter Sussman in his after-school hours 
filling out a typical T.A. day. 




RELAXING after a long day at 
school, Walt tries to play a game of 
chess, ncn-too easy feat, considering 
the number of Kibitzers. 




THE SUSSMAN FAMILY. In the 
eyes of his parents, Walt is not 
merely ""typical," but something ex- 
tra special. 





AT HOME; Checking on a 
homework assignment. 



ON THE EVE of each Sabbath, upon returning from 
religious services, Walter follows his father in the recitation 
of the Kiddush. 






RELAXING OVER A SODA, our boys 
discuss T.A.'s exciting game at Madison 
Square Garden. 



THE CHORAL GROUP provides another 
Form of diversion and pleasure. 




KEEPING UP with T.A.'s 
scholastic standards means 
burning che midnight oil. 



POOPED after a hard day, 
Walt catnaps before going to bed. 





Left-right: Mr. Bluth, Mr. Lilker, L. Wohl. 



VaHetif Vi^kt 



Variety Night was originated last year, and its 
purpose was to give T.A. students a chance to dis- 
play their talents in various fields. Its great suc- 
cess last year warranted another such night this 
year, during the spring term. Our G. 0. has also 
benefited, as the show proved a tremendous finan- 
cial success. We sincerely hope that this worth- 
while tradition will be continued for many a year. 




— 72 — 



I 



_L 










I 



Jews \n Science 



By JOSEF E. FISHER 



X HE establishment of the State of Israel in 
May, 1948 marked the end of a period of almost 
2,000 years, during which the Jews had no home- 
land, no piece of soil they could call their own. In 
the course of this exile, the Hebrews spread out 
all over the globe, and they became inhabitants of 
various countries, always, however, retaining their 
individuality as Jews. 

Together with the other people of the various 
countries, Jews have formulated a large part of the 
customs and have contributed a large portion to the 
foundations of modern civilization. Some fields in 
which the Jew has achieved renown are music, 
philosophy, and law. Nontheless, no contribution is 
greater than the part the Jews have played in scien- 
tific progress. We find examples of Jewish scientists 
from about the beginning of the common era. 

We all know of the achievements of the Romans 
in such fields as writing, architecture, and sculpture. 
Yet, in spite of the grandeur that was Rome, no 
one ever refers to the Romans as great mathema- 
ticians. Why, among a people as ingenious and 
industrious as the Romans are there no individuals 
who have delved into the mysteries of mathematics? 
The answer is simple and tragic. Because of the 
Roman system of numerals, equations would become 
unwieldy and cumbersome, and thus in the field of 
mathematics — stagnation! 

The Western world now utilizes the so-called 
Arabic system of numerals; therefore, there must 
have been a transition, a time when the Arabic 
numerals were introduced to the Western world. 
This marks the first monumental achievement of our 
people in the scientific field. A number of Jews, 
particularly Johannes Hispaolensis, or John of Se- 
ville, were instrumental in introducing this new set 
of numerals. Although the new system had not 
completely permeated Europe until the sixteenth cen- 
tury, it was utilized by learned men before that 
time. Thus, a great debt is owed to a Hebrew who 
translated from the Arabic a numbers system con- 
venient for scientific work. 

At approximately the same time, Indian geometry 
was introduced to the western world by Abraham 
bar Hiyya, whose original text in Hebrew was trans- 
lated into Latin by Plato of Tivoli. 



Modern photography is founded on the discovery 
of the noted philosopher Levi ben Gershom, who 
discovered the camera obscura. He noticed that it 
was possible to reflect the rays of an external object 
on a flat plain, on which the image could be traced. 
Thij discovery, together with the younger Hershel's 
contribution of light-sensitive paper, made the mod- 
ern camera possible and laid the foundation for 
photograph}' as we know it today. The fact that 
this phenomenon is now utilized for astronomical 
observation is also noteworthy. Levi ben Gershom 
also invented Jacob's staff, a form of an astro- 
labe. In his voyage to the New World, Columbus 
utilized this instrument for navigational purposes. 

In the field of mathematics there are many scien- 
tists to consider. Let us be content, however, to 
mention the name of Carl Gustav Jacobi, whose 
works were published in seven volumes after his 
death. These volumes were at first edited by Jacobi's 
brilliant student, K.W. Borchardt, and later by the 
famous Weierstrass, who took over the editing after 
Borchardt passed on. 

The field of mathematics, and science in general, 
suffered a great loss when the mathematical wizard 
F.G.M. Einstein passed away at the age of 29. He 
was praised by that greatest of all mathematicians, 
Gauss, as having talents given to one person in a 
century. The young scientist's works were considered 
so brilliant that Gauss himself published them in 
1848. 

The field of astronomy during the 18th century 
was dominated by a German-Jewish scientist who 
migrated from Hamburg to England while still a 
young man. William Herschel was this man's name, 
and while holding a part-time job as an organist, 
studied astronomy and finally achieved the well-nigh 
impossible. Together with his sister, he charted the 
sky as no man before him had done. He also con- 
structed his own telescopes on a large scale. From 
the viewpoint of practical contributions, it may be 
said that no other astronomer compares with him. 
Two of the many modern astronomers who have 
achieved acclaim are Maurice Loewy, who, as one 
of the greatest observational astronomers of the 19th 
century, devised the two part telescope, now in com- 
mon use, and Karl Schwartzchild responsible for the 



— 74- 



equation on the atmosphere of the sun. He also 
devised equations for computing the stability of 
rotary masses. Thus we see, in spite of the slow 
start the Jews got off to in the field of astronomy 
owing to lack of needed elaborate equipment they, 
nevertheless, finished strong and produced some of 
the greatest names in the field. 

Another German-Jewish scientist, Emile Berliner, 
greatly improved communications by inventing tele- 
phonic devices now in common use. His fame has 
been eclipsed by that of Edison, whose commercial 
success in this field has caused the Wizard of Menio 
Park to be recognized as the inventor of these de- 
vices. 

We now go to the field of medicine, in which 
the Jew's contributions date back to antiquity. Karl 
Sudhoff, the great medical historian, wrote, "with 
the giving of the Torah there came two of the 
greatest hvgienic ideas ever conceived, the weekl\ 
day of rest and the direct prophylaxsis of disease." 

In spite of the anti-Semitism which prevailed in 
the middle ages, Jewish physicians cared for the 
major rulers of Europe. A number of individuals 
have achieved acclaim for their work in the medical 
field. 

The first was Isaac Israeli of Kairuoan, known as 
Isaac Judeaus to the medieval scholars. His views on 
fever have influenced thinking until the present 
and his authoritative work, "De Gradibus Simpli- 
cium," was translated into Latin by Constantine the 
African. This book was the main source for furthe/ 
work in the field of pharmacology. 

The greatest name in Jewish medieval life was 
Moses Maimonides, the Rambam. His profession was 
medicine, and he wrote two great works in this 
field. The first was his "Treatise on Poisons and 
Antidotes." The second and more famous work, 
"Aphorisms," was considered by the great Mercuria- 
lis to be of no less caliber than a work by Hippocrates 
on the same subject. Yet the most remarkable thing 
about this brilliant man was that he advocated prin- 
ciples which are being put into practice at the pre- 
sent time. He realized the relation between the mind 
and the body and made provision for the patient's 
mind. This is shown by the fact that although he 
was against faith treatment, he sanctioned it for 
the patient's peace of mind. While recommending 
fresh air and sunshine, he said that exercise should 
be taken only in moderation. 

The natural proclivities for the healing art by the 
Marrano Jews were phenomenal. Also known as 



the Crypto-Jews, they were forced to embrace 
Christianity during the Inquisition of the l4th and 
15th centuries. They did, however, cherish inwardly 
the religion of their forefathers and continued in 
the medical profession. Of these Portuguese Jews, 
Sir Clement Markham considers Garcia D'Orta the 
greatest. D'Orta studied men in relation to nature 
and wrote the first scientific work ever to be written 
in Portuguese — "CoUoqious dos simples £ Dorgas 
Medicinaes", written in 1563. His description of 
Asiatic cholera and medicinal plants remain unsur- 
passed. D'Orta's family was, however, persecuted, 
and only his timely death saved the great physician 
from the agonies he would have undergone. 

Rodrigo de Castro, also a Marrano, laid the 
foundations for gynecology, the doctrine of the 
diseases of women, as we know it today. He also 
wrote a book of medical jurisprudence, as one of 
the early advocates of the doctrine. The city of 
Hamburg was benefited by his outstanding services, 
and his devotion to the sick during the plague of 
1654 has become a legend. 

During the nineteenth century, progress was made 
in various fields which laid the foundations for 
the advances in medicine during the 20th century. 

Medical science was almost revolutionized as a 
result of the studies of Jacob Henle, a microscopic 
anatomyst. This German-Jewish scientist was the 
first to accurately describe the skin and other linings 
of various organs in the body. His "General Ana- 
tomy," published in 184 1, remains one of the most 
authoritative works on the subject and may today 
be consulted with profit. 

One of the pioneers in the science of endocrino- 
logy was Moritz Schiff, whose discoveries in this 
field laid the foundations for many subsequent dis- 
coveries. The hormones studied by Schiff are now 
being used to combat such diseases as arthritis and 
such dreaded diseases as cancer may be overcome b\ 
the use of hormones. 

Whereas there may be conflicts in various fields 
of science as to who discovered what, there is no 
doubt as to the originator of psychoanalysis. Sig- 
mund Freud, "The Columbus of the Sub-Conscience 
World," influenced human thought in every branch 
of intellectual life with his theories. It was through 
him that many mentally ill now can be made to take 
their places as responsible citizens of the world. Thus, 
mankind owes a great debt to a Viennese Jewish 
psychiatrist who first iltNctl into the mysteries of 
the subconscience mind. 



— 75 



Remarkable progress was made by Marcus Eliezer 
Bloch, who, although unable to read German at 
the age of 19, worked very diligently and founded 
the science of ichthyology, the study of fish. His 
work on the subject remained the standard in the 
field for many years. 

In the middle of the 19th century, a theory per- 
sisted that life could arise from inanimate objects. 
Many contributed proof to discredit this theory, but 
it was the Jewish scientist, Ferdinand Cohn, who 
gave the coup de grace to the theory of spontaneous 
generation. This theory, which had obstructed scien- 
tific progress for many years, was finally discarded 
and science was free to make advances in various 
fields. 

The most brilliant electrical engineer ever to hold 
a piece of wire was Charles Proteus Steinmetz. The 
appropriate name, the "Electrical Wizard," was given 
to him at the General Electrical Company,"^%ere-jie_, 

served as Chief Consulting Engineer for many years^_ 

Many of his developments are now being used to 
make life more comfortable for us. 

With the advent of the Nobel Prize, our task of 
recognizing genius became relatively eisy. At the end 
of the 19th century, a Swedish inventor, Alfred: : 
Nobel, invented dynamite. Since he had originally 
intended it as an instrument of progress in the time 
of peace, he was very distressed when he saw to 
what uses it was being put. Therefore, utilizing the 
money he made from his terrifying invention, he 
established the Nobel Peace Prizes. These prizes were 
to be awarded to the one who accomplishes the most 
outstanding achievement in the fields of physics, 

chemistry, medicine, literature, and world peace. Tt 

is noteworthy to add that numerically, the Jewish / 
recipients of the prizes are exceeded only by the 
German and French recipients, some of whom, inci- 
dentally, were Jewish. 

One scientist whose name needs no introduction 
is Albert Einstein, the originator of the Theory of 
Relativity. This theory is said to be so complicated 
that only a few physicists can appreciate its conse- 
quences. The stark reality that there is an atomic 
bomb silenced the sceptics forever. The mighty wea- 
pon showed that the Theory of Relativity is correct, 
at least, in part. The venerable professor is now 
working on relationships between the various forces 
known to exist in this world. 

While we are on the topic of relativity, it is only 
fair to mention the names of three fellow-Jews who 
laid the basis. Tullion Levi-Civita developed the ab- 



solute calculus, the necessary mathematical instru- 
ment for the theory. Hermann Minowski gave the 
mathematical basis. The scientist who gave the physi- 
cal impetus to the theory is Albert Michelson, a phy- 
sicist famoui in his own right. In the classic Michel- 
son-Morley experiment, he proved that the earth 
is not drifting in a stationary ether, thus destroying 
that theory forever. This and other experiments 
earned him the coveted Nobel Prize in physics. 

The youngest of all Nobel Prize winners is 
James Franck, a Jew, who received the prize in 1926 
for the experimental confirmation of the quantum 
theory. Gustav Hertz, who received the prize for 
research in the theories of atoms, and Gabriel Lipp- 
man, the inventor of color photography, are but 
two of the many Jews who have received the Nobel 
Prize in physics. 

Chief of the Atomic-jEnergy research program is 
J. Robert Oppenheimer,| a Jewish physicist who has 
3chieve<li fame because of his research in that field. 
For sorhe strange i^SDn^'fhe Jews have always been 
more successful in' the field of medicine. This 
holds tr^e for the [Nobel Prizes, since most of the 
Jewish pcipients received citations in the field of 
TiieciicineT^ 

A saga of patience and exhaustive research is that 
of Paul Ehrlich's war on syphillis. The drug he 
finally obtained to combat the disease was named 
Salvasan 606, for it was the 606th chemical and 
drug to be tried. The world owes a great debt to 
Ehrlich's patience. Incidentally, the Nobel Prize 
committee appreciated the discovery enough to 
award him the prize in medicine in 1908. 
—y-Airfniportant life-saving technique was made pos- 
,/sible by Karl Landsteiner, who received the Nobel 
Prize for his research on the metabolism of cancer, 
which made possible the steps which are being taken 
to cure the dreaded disease. Otto Leowi received the 
coveted citation for his determination of the chemi- 
cal nature of the nervous impulses. 

The most recent recipient of the Nobel Prize for 
medicine is the Jewish scientist, Selman Waksman. 
His discovery of the new wonder drug streptomycin, 
was a great step towards the cure of the dreaded 
disease, tuberculosis. 

Thus we can see, that the Jews, although a small 
minority, nevertheless contributed greatly to civili- 
zation, and in the long run, improved the lot of the 
great majority, all of mankind. 

Only through science can Israel become a land 
flowing with milk and honey. 



— 76 — 



Chaim 
Weizmame 



By LEONARD INDYK 



V_^HAIM Weizmann won renown in man) 
fields of human endeavor. He was a teacher, states- 
man, and scientist. A great deal of his fame was 
derived from his work in the field of chemistry. 
This scientific work also had a vast effect upon 
world Jewry. Since this Eichanite is dedicated to 
Jewish scientists, it is appropriate that this article 
concern itself with Chaim Weizmann's work in 
science and the effect of this work on the Jewish 
people. 

Chaim Weizmann's most important scientific dis- 
covery was the process for the synthetic manufacture 
of acetone. This is the story of how this discover)' 
came about and the far reaching effect it had in 
both the scientific and political fields of the world. 

In 1910 the world was threatened with a shortage 
of natural rubber. The chemists of the world em- 
barked on a search for a method of manufacturing 
rubber synthetically. At that time Weizmann was 
teaching biochemistry at Manchester University. He 
too decided to try to produce S)nthetic rubber, 
attacking the problem in the following manner: 

Since rubber is composed of polymerized isoprene, 
and isoprene can be manufactured from isoamyl 
alcohol, therefore the logical starting point would 
be to manufacture synthetic isoamyl alcohol. And 
since this alcohol was a byproduct of alcoholic fer- 
mentation, but in quantities not sufficient to warrant 
exploitation, Weizmann searched for a bacterium 
which would produce by fermentation more isoamyl 
alcohol than the yeast used in ordinary fermenta- 
tions did. In the course of his investigations Weiz- 
mann used bacteria granulobacter pectinovora which 
he had obtained from the Pasteur Institute of Paris. 
The result of the fermentation of sugar by this 
bacteria was a liquid which smelled very much like 
isoamyl alcohol. However, upon distilling the liquid 
Weizmann found that it contained by weight 60% 
acetone, 30% ethyl alcohol, and 10% butyl alcohol. 
His superior on the chemistr) staff of Manchester 
University, Dr. Perkins, told him to pour it down 



the drain because he considered it worthless. Weiz- 
mann, however, declined to discard an)- pure chemi- 
cal. The sagacity of this decision will be seen later, 
for the acetone obtained was used in the war and 
was the main part of his discovery. However, to 
digress a bit, Weizmann saw that merely through 
fermentation he could not obtain enough isoamyl 
alcohol. But it was possible that the butyl alcohol 
obtained in the process which was similar to isoamyl 
alcohol could be made into butadiene and the buta- 
diene then polymerized into a rubber. Weizmann 
tried this approach and was successful in producing 
a synthetic rubber of a quality similar to that of 
natural rubber. For a long time this was the onl\' 
method we had for producing synthetic rubber. 
This was the famous process used by the Germans 
in World War I for producing their rubber called 
Buna (from the German BUtadiene Natrium. Na- 
trium is German for metallic sodium which was an 
important reagent in the process). This rubber, 
however, was rather hard and not as good as natural 




rubber which was very soft. Later on, during World 
War II, Weizmann came to the United States to 
work on the synthetic rubber problem. While he 
was here he discovered a method for the reproduc- 
tion of isoprene which was what he was originally 
searching for. By the condensation of acetone and 
acetelyne he obtained isoprene which was then used 
to make a synthetic rubber which was as soft as 
natural rubber, unlike Buna. As a result of these 
two important discoveries, during World War II, 
most of the tires had buna as the hard outer surface 
and a combination of Buna and isoprene rubber for 
the soft inner tube. 

This work on rubber was only one of Weizmann's 
achievements. A second, greater discovery came 
about as a result of these experiments on the pro- 
duction of synthetic rubber. As you remember, in 
his original fermentation process Weizmann obtained 
a liquid which was approximately 60% pure acetone. 
He recorded the process and filed it for a future 
need. This need arose in August, 1914, when the 
British government requested all scientists to send 
in reports of all past work and their present projects. 
Weizmann submitted the report on his fermentation 
process. Nothing was heard from the British govern- 
ment until the Spring of 1916 when a representative 
of Nobels', a large munitions manufacturer, called 
on Dr. Weizmann and offered to buy his process. 
Weizmann was astounded for he had attached no 
technical importance to the discovery and in conse- 
quence thereof had neither patented it nor published 
anything on it. Weizmann signed the contract and 
was ready to commence operations when the news 
came that the plant which he was to use had been 
blown up. Weizmann had to terminate the contract 
with Nobels for they had no other plant available 
for the project. 

However, Nobels brought the matter to the at- 
tention of the British Admiralty and in March of 
that year Weizmann was called to the Admiralty. 
The head of the Admiralty's powder department ex- 
plained to Weizmann that a serious shortage had 
developed in the supply of acetone. Acetone was 
used as the solvent for cordite in the manufacture 
of explosives for naval guns. Without acetone, the 
guns would be useless. Therefore the Admiralty 
laboratories were put at Weizmann's disposal and 
he started immediately to set up a pilot plant to 
test the commercial application of the process. A 
few weeks after the preliminary conference, Weiz- 
mann had an interview with the First Lord of the 



Admiralty, Mr. Winston Churchill, who started the 
discussion with these words: 

"Well, Dr. Weizmann, we need 30,000 tons of 
acetone. Can you make it?" 

The world knows that Weizmann succeeded in 
filling Churchill's request. 

When Weizmann started working he was con- 
fronted with several problems. Up to now he had 
onl)' produced several hundred cubic centimeters of 
acetone in his laboratory on an experimental basis. 
If he could somehow produce one ton of acetone, 
then he could produce any amount needed. The 
main problem was in the commercial aspects of the 
process and this could only be handled by a brewing 
engineer. Therefore he needed many engineers, 
equipment, and raw materials which could only be 
obtained through the government. Churchill gave 
him CARTE BLANCHE authority for all and 
any men and materials he needed. Weizmann set up 
his first plant in an old gin factory. The Admiralty 
also built a second plant specifically for the purpose 
of carrying on the fermentation process. However, 
when the project was going full blast the Food 
Controller refused to give them any more maize 
which was the carbohydrate which they were using. 
Weizmann herewith substituted horse chestnuts for 
the maize, but the supply of these soon gave out as 
well. Subsequent researches indicated that the Weiz- 
mann process could be used with most sugars and 
starches, i- ^ 

Because of the obvious impossibility of obtaining 
large enough stocks of carbohydrates in England, 
operations were transferred to Canada. The first 
plant was set up in the Gooderham distillery in 
Toronto. This plant used maize as the starch. Of 
the total weight of maize processed, the amount of 
chemicals obtained by weight were 7% acetone, l4% 
butyl alcohol, and 7.6% ethyl alcohol. ^ 

After getting the Toronto plant underway, Weiz- 
mann went to the corn belt of Canada to set up 
another plant near Terre Haute. WTien the United 
States entered the war two more plants were set up 
in Terre Haute. The obvious advantage of this lo- 
cation was its proximity to a ready supply of starch 
in the form of corn. After the war these plants 
were taken over by Commercial Solvents and are 
still operating today. ^ 

We have seen how Weizmann discovered the 
process and then set up the plants which supplied 
the needed acetone. To get a true evaluation of 
these accomplishments, we have but to see what 



— 78- 



Lloyd George, the Prime Minister at that time, had 
to say about Weizmann in his autobiography. '■ 

"Dr. Weizmann, with his discovery not only 
helped us to win the war, but made a permanent 
mark upon the map of the world ... Dr. Weiz- 
mann's scientific brain absolutely saved the British 
army at a critical time." 

The immediate result of Weizmann's discover) 
was of course the winning of World War I by the 
Allies. However, for the Jews the world over there 
was a more important result. I am referring to 
the Balfour Declaration. This declaration issued on 
November 2, 1917 declared the support of the 
British government for "the establishment in Pal- 
estine of a National Home for the Jewish People." 

While he was working for the government in 
1916-17 Weizmann actively lobbied for such a docu- 
ment among such higher-ups of the British govern- 
ment as Asquith, Lloyd George, Smuts, Churchill, 
and Balfour. Once Churchill called Weizmann into 
his office in the Admiralty and asked what he 
wanted as a reward for his discovery. Weizmann 
answered : 

"There is only one thing I want — a national 
home for my people." 

However Weizmann was not content with having 
just one power affirm the right of the Jews to a 
national homeland in Palestine; he wanted the whole 
world to acknowledge and concur in the Balfour 
Declaration. Through correspondence with Justice 
Brandeis and President Wilson he got the United 
States to adopt the Declaration by a joint Congres- 
sional resolution. Then in August, 1924, the Balfour 
Declaration was incorporated in England's mandate 
over Palestine by a unanimous vote of the League 
of Nations. There ensued thereafter 23 years of 
struggles with the Arabs and the British which 
finally terminated with the United Nations resolu- 
tion of November 29, 1947 which established the 
independent State of Israel. However, this belongs 
to another chapter of history. 

Getting back to the period which I am mainly 
concerned with, 1910-1924, besides political reper- 
cussions Weizmann's discover) had a far reaching 
effect on the world of science. When the project 
was well under way, the butyl alcohol produced in 
the process was converted into methyl ethyl ketone, 
a war chemical. However, when the war ended, the 



demand for methyl ethyl ketone also ended. Com- 
mercial Solvents, nevertheless, continued operations, 
for acetone was needed in peacetime as well as in 
wartime and large stocks of butyl alcohol accumu- 
lated. Weizmann and his associates devised new and 
ingenious uses fot butyl alcohol. Through these 
efforts completely new industries came into being 
such as plastics, synthetic rubbers, high octane avia- 
tion fuels, and nitrocellulose lacquers. 

In summation, we have seen that Chaim Weiz- 
mann's discovery had three important results: 

1 — World War I was won by the Allies. 

2 — As an indirect result, new industries such as 

lacquers, aviation fuels and plastics were created. 

3 — The Balfour Declaration — the first concrete 

step towards the establishment of a Jewish State 
in Palestine — • was issued. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1 — Seed Culture Methods in the Production of 
Acetone and Butyl Alcohol by a Fermentation 
Process by H. B. Speakman 

Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistrv 
V. 12 

2 — A Stud)' of the Acetone and Butyl Alcohol 
Fermentations of Various Carbohydrates 

b)- Guy G. Robinson 
Journal of Biological Chemistr)' V. 53 

3 — Biochemistry of the Acetone and Butyl Alco- 
hol Fermentations of Starch by Baccillus Granulo- 
bacter Pectimovorum by H. B. Speakman 

Journal of Biological Chemistry V. 41 

4 — ■ Butyl Alcohol and Acetone from Starch 

by M. E. Nasmith of Commercial Solvents 
Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering X. 24 
No. 12 

5 — War Memoirs by Da^•id Llovd George \'. II 
* N. Y. Times — November 28, 1951 

GENERAL 
Trial and Error by Chaim Weizmann 

Chaim Weizmann — Statesman, Scientist, Builder of 
the Jewish Commonwealth 

Edited by Meyer W. Weisgal 

Chaim Weizmann — A tribute on His Seventieth 
Birthday 

Edited bv Paul Goodman 



79 



KENmSfJINIi... 



Ed. note: 

The students of our Talmudical Academy are indeed 
fortunate in having a science faculty of high calibre. 
Comprised of Mr. Samuel H. Lebowitz, Mr. Julius 
Landowne, and Mr. Theodore Kallner, this department 
has made a great contribution towards the academic 
advancement of the student body. Theodore Kallner. 
a graduate of Yeshiva University, is a comparative 
newcomer to our teaching staff. In the little more 
than two years that he has been with us, he has irv- 
stilled in his students a deep interest in their first 
contacts with scientific experiments. Julius Landowne 
has taught biology in the Brooklyn Branch of Tal- 
mudical Academ.y since its founding. His biology 
classes remain vivid in the hearts and minds of all 
T.A. alumni for years after they have left us. 

Because Mr. Samuel H. Lebowitz came to Brooklyn 
after many years of teaching in Yeshiva University 
High School, Manhattan, he may be considered, from 
the standpoint of service in our school, the senior 
member of this trio. We, therefore, feel that a re- 
count of his experience and activities with us would 
be of great interest to those who are connected with 
our school. 



Our versatile teacher of science and mathe- 
matics was born in Brooklyn in the year 1901. 
He received his high school education at Towns- 
end Harris Hall High School and a Bachelor 
of Science degree from City College in 1922. 
Itnmediately following his graduation, he began 
to teach in the public school system. While 
teaching, Mr. Lebowitz was studying for his 



By SAMUEL H. LEBOWITZ 

Master of Arts degree, which he received from 
Columbia in 1926. Talmudical Academy of up- 
town employed his talents beginning in 1930. He 
now heads the Chemistry Department in Textile 
High School in New York. 

His wealth of knowledge of textiles has mani- 
fested itself in the form of inventions in the 
textile field. Many of our present-day articles 
of clothing are made of synthetic fibers, which 
cannot accept the customary laundering and 
ironing. A machine was invented by Mr. Lebo- 
ivitz which indicates the amount of heat dif- 
ferent articles can take without injury to them. 
This machine was welcomed by the major com- 
panies, to whom the trial and error method was 
both costly and inaccurate. 

Mr. Lebowitz's contribution to the war ef- 
fort in the past world conflict was a very unigue 
and valuable one. He wrote a book dealing with 
the various types of machines, one of which 
was used to train mechanics for the armed 
forces. 

Mr. Lebowitz's other momentous contribution 
on another battle front is his twenty-two years 
of long, suffering, patient endurance with Tal- 
mudical Academy students. We, feeling that 
no one can recount those years as well as Mr. 
Lebowitz himself can, persuaded him to write 
the following article: 



I 



have just come to realize, that in spite of my 
apparent youth, time is moving inexorably on, and 
I, despite my best efforts to the contrary, am getting 
old. What brought this realization home to me was 
a request by Rabbi Faivelson, himself one of my 
former students and now a colleague on the Yeshiva 
faculty, that I write some reminiscences, under the 
general title of "My Twenty-three Years in T. A.," 
or "Why I Was Never Graduated." 

As I look back at it, it seems only yesterday that 
I first traveled uptown to join the teachers' staff. 
Dr. I. A. Schwartz who knew me at Textile, and who 
was then teaching French at the Yeshiva, told me of 



a vacancy for a chemistry teacher. I applied for and 
obtained the position. I've been at it ever since. As 
to why I was never graduated, the answer is obvious. 
I never wanted to be. I have my contacts with the 
developing of intellects of T.A. boys, and I have 
loved all these boys like a father — which, indeed, I 
am to three of them. 

My first mistake, not a serious one, at T.A. was 
an offer I made to my first chemistry class. Basing 
my judgment on past experience in other schools, 
I rashly offered to treat any boy whose regents 
examination mark exceeded 90 to a Broadway show. 
Little did I know that these boys needed no urging 



— 80- 



to work for good marks. Yet a Broadway show did 
hold some appeal. Consequentl)' in June, 1930, I 
was to be seen with a group of about twenty 
attending a fine Shakespearean show. A little basic 
arithmetic convinced me that there was no profit in 
the deal — my month's wages going to pay for a 
show. A wise man by now, I didn't repeat the 
offer a second time. 

We did, however, organize a victory party at 
which the chemistry class each term celebrated its 
success in the examinations. In view of the fact 
that one of the boys, Davy Hill, was the son of a 
salami manufacturer, the parties were "fleishig." 
We had a lot of fun, and a few bellyaches. I 
was still young. 

At about this time, I became faculty adviser to 
the G.O. and the Elchanite. We organized a G.O. 
store which, after it had proved successful as a 
T.A. venture, was taken over by our graduates as 
the Yeshiva College Co-op Store. I believe it is 
still in business some twenty years after. We 
managed to get out the Elchanite — the cost was 
not so great then as it is now — but neither was 
the income. At times, I had to finance the deal 
myself, but somehow whatever losses were involved 
they seemed to be worthwhile. 

In those depression years, even necessities were 
sometimes unobtainable. When the need for a 
moving picture projector was felt, the boys or- 
ganized a Science Show and Lecture. At ten cents 
a ticket we packed the hall, and the projertor was 
on its way. 

I became teacher of physics, in addition to chem- 
istry. The subject of light and lenses seemed to 
have a strange fascination for my boys, I suppose, 
because three quarters of them wore glasses. I still 
recall introducing the first lesson by e.xamining those 
of a yoimg man who has since become Rabbi Berzon 
but who was known as Astigmatism for some time. 
Several of the boys became oculists. In particular, 
we had a young fellow who was known as "Quack" 
Levy, because he possessed a strange ability to imi- 
tate a duck. I'm afraid I turned his quacking to 
good account by calling him a Quack Doctor of 
Eyes. Another optometrist from uptown is Isadore 
Kumin whose nephew, Marvin Bashkowitz, was later 
one of our fine Brooklyn boys. 

There was always a considerable group of boys 
whose primary interest became science. I can men- 
tion only a few of these. Some I have lost contact 
with completely, some I know through others. In 



all probability there are more of whose scientific 
work I know nothing. However, among the M.D.'s 
I recall Dr. Safir's son, Enoch, who had a hard time 
with the boys, understandably, since his father was 
principal. Dr. Mordecai Gabriel, now a Professor 
of Biology at Brooklyn College, was one of our 
boys. So was Dr. Jacob Goldman, presently a pro- 
fessor at Carnegie Tech and a leading authority on 
electromagnetism. He serves as consultant both to 
the Westinghouse Electric Company and to the U.S. 
Atomic Energy Commission. Rabbi's Faivelson and 
Kanotopsky, and Martin Lilker, of our present facul- 
ty in Brooklyn, were among my students. 

In 1942, I was obliged to take a leave of absence 
to write a book for pre-induction training. Within 
a few years after m)' return, plans were made for 
opening a branch of T.A. in Brooklyn. Since I was 
a Brooklyn resident by this time, I became ver\' much 
interested in this project, and worked with the com- 
mittee that planned the reconstruction of the first 
building on the corner of President Street and Bed- 
ford Avenue. There followed fights with the archi- 
tect, arguments with my fellow committeemen, and 
finally victory in the choice of Room 101 as the 
science lecture hall. Time, I think, has proved mc 
right in demanding it, for our science classes would 
not fit in the smaller rooms originally suggested. 

As soon as Brooklyn T.A. was opened, I trans- 
ferred my activities there. I gave up a stead\-. but 
non-lucrative taxi service which I had been con- 
ducting, bringing Brooklyn boys home from T..\. 
Uptown each night. 

I now concentrated m\ efforts on equipping the 
Brooklyn Branch for science instruction. As always, 
finances were a problem, but we did manage reason- 
ably to get adequate apparatus and materials. At 
first I taught General Science, then as the full high 
school developed. Physics and Chemistry. 




— 81- 



I have kept in mind, as I worked with our boys, 
the original aim of the secular department of the 
Yeshiva, to produce a synthesis of the hereditarj' 
culture of Judaism with the secular knowledge of 
our times. We discuss, when the occasion arises, the 
use of baking powders on Pesach, or the chemistry 
involved in the conversion of fats and oils to soaps 
with respect to Kashruth, gelatines, hydrogenated 
fats etc. When necessary we obtain, thru the boys, 
rulings from their Talmud Rabbis. Thus I feel the 
boys have been guided into proper procedures for 
Orthodox Jews, and those who are destined to be 
Rabbis have learned the scientific facts to which 
they can apply their Talmudical knowledge and 
skill in making Rabbinic rulings. 

Occasionally we have a bit of unexpected fun in 
class. Some of our chemicals have distinctive odors. 
On occasion these permeate the building resulting in 
a temporary loss of prestige for the chemistry teach- 
er. Sometimes they penetrate the clothes of a par- 
ticular student, a circumstance that makes him ex- 
tremely unpopular with those who must subsequently 
sit near him. 

We rarely have anything approaching an accident, 
but just to show the perversity of fate, I must re- 
count this incident. One student was extremely fear- 
ful of anything that even resembled a chemical ac- 
tion. He was afraid of poison, fire, and explosion. 
Consequently, each time an experiment or demon- 
stration was contemplated, he discreetly withdrew to 
the far corner of the room. In the course of time, 
seeing that no untoward incident occurred, and that 
students who were right up front returned to school 
day after day, he became more courageous. Finally, 



he had worked his way right up to the front line — 
when boom went a little sodium. And who do 
you suppose was hit? None other than our friend, 
who occupied that extreme rear corner from then on. 
Brooklyn T.A. is a young school but already we 
can be proud of the science achievements and prom- 
ise of our graduates, and students. In the graduating 
classes including June 1953, we have had three 
Honorable Mention Winners in the Westinghouse 
National Science Talent Search: Melvin Cohen, 
Judah Schwartz, and Josef Fischer. Since these are 
the only three who have entered their work, it is 
clear that our success is unusual. Some of our boys 
are presently in medical and dental schools. Among 
those I know of, is Paul Salkin who even as a 
T.A. freshman was sure that this was his field. 
Mordecai Katz has been having great success at 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, and will make his 
name as an engineer, I have no doubt. There are 
numerous others — so many of them that I can't 
think of them as individuals. All these fine science 
students, have been all-around boys participating in 
extra-curricular activities and rendering services to 
the school. In spite of old crowded quarters, in 
spite of having to run from building to building 
for classes, in spite of a lack of fancy gymnasiums 
and elaborate apparatus, they have all pitched in to 
develop a fine school spirit, and a wonderful school. 
Our Arista, honor society of high school grade, in- 
cludes a large percentage of each graduating class. 
I like to feel that in some small way, I have helped 
to shape the lives of our students and to make the 
school what it is. 




■82 




Sinclair Lewis 

Crusader Against Hypocrisif 



By LIONEL GROSSBARD 



JL HE characteristic literature of America dur- 
ing the prosperous '20's has dealt in criticism of her 
outlook, habits, manners, and practically all other 
aspects of the daily life of her people. The prin- 
cipal figure in this literature has been Sinclair Lewis. 
The ostensible objects of ridicule in his literature 
are not American institutions but American com- 
placency', provincialism, narrowness of thought, un- 
questioning enthusiasm for the familiar and distrust 
of the unfamiliar, cultural ignorance, and the reduc- 
tion of all life's values to a material and commercial 
basis. Lewis promulgates his idealisms by making 
ridiculous the folly and unloveliness that must be 
removed before the desired wisdom and beauty can 
be attained. 

Nowhere in his novels did Lewis do any cheek 
turning. He could not endure what he regarded as 
moral cowardice or hypocrisy and resolved to ex- 
pose it — not caring whom on the social scale it 
affected — be it the physician or the clergyman. 

"Main Street" was Lewis' first actual attempt at 
exposing the hypocrisy existent in the small towns. 
It still remains the fiercest indictment that he or any- 
one else has yet brought against provincial America. 

Lewis planned "Main Street" as an artistic rather 



than commercial book, hoping it would at best sell 
five or six thousand copies. However, this novel 
swept America off its feet a year or two after the 
first World War. Because it employed all of his 
powers of observation and satire, it gained him uni- 
versal recognition. "Main Street" is the story of a 
young woman, Carol Kennicott, a graduate of a 
large Western University, who marries a physician 
in a small frontier town. Carol Kennicott brings 
with her to Gopher Prairie a thin culture, Nague in 
its objectives, and trivial in its requirements, which 
seldom goes beyond an attractive setting and good 
talk. Her husband is stolid and dependable, truth- 
ful and loyal in all his relations. His devotion to 
his profession Carol accepts as a matter-of-course. 
At times, however, she finds irksome and even un- 
bearable, the loyalty which prompts his boisterous 
'boosting' of Gopher Prairie. He places her among 
people who share his civic enthusiasm, without al- 
wavs sharing his personal virtues. 

Gopher Prairie society consists in the first place 
of a group of men who have made money easily 
out of the natural resources of the place, who re- 
gard themselves highly for having done so, and 
hold the town in esteem because its glor\- is theirs; 



— 83 — 



and secondly a group of women, each of whom has 
no other standard of values than her husband's in- 
come, and only limited opportunities for enjoying 
even these. Carol proposes to reform the town, 
socially, aesthetically, and politically, and is broken 
because her intellectual sensibilities, superficial even 
in herself, cannot possibly function among men and 
women whose vulgar grossness requires a new set 
of values, not new manners, in order to make a 
culture of their own. There is no reality in Carol, 
not even an emotional reality, though it is ques- 
tionable whether Lewis, himself, in 1920 understood 
how artificial were her standards. The best she can 
do toward adjustment to life is to escape for a year 
or so to Washington, where she can talk, if not 
practice, intellectual improvement, and then to re- 
turn with sufficient tolerance to settle down as just 
another Gopher Prairie resident. 

The town is the real subject and triumph of 
"Main Street" — not Carol, who is, after all, an 
example of Lewis' somewhat naive admiration, in 
1920, for the "intelligentsia." Although Lewis real- 
ized that many communities in France and England 
were duller, meaner, and less literate than these mid- 
Western towns, his fierce idealism for America 
makes "Main Street" a crusade against the cheap- 
ness of American ambitions. His men think in 
stereotypes. They profess the liberalism of their 
forefathers but practice economic domination of the 
impoverished farmers who are too slow to live by 
their wits. Their conversation seldom gets beyond 
the twelve-year age level. The women live by gos- 
sip, and culture is a tepid circulating of stale and 
harmless ideas. But Sinclair Lewis does not hate 
Main Street. Rather he is indignant at it, as at 
a thing that one loves. He is indignant because of 
the beauty it wastes, the hills it denudes and covers 
with unsightly boards, the hearts it depresses and 
the minds it stultifies. But even more, he loves the 
virtues of the world which Main Street would 
annihilate, and it is as a prophet that he perceives 
and cries out against its attacks on those of its 
possessions which man must always find enduringly 
valuable when he lifts his head beyond Main Street's 
confines. He sees that if Main Street holds out long 
enough and does not permit the world to vanquish 
it, it will eventually conquer the world, and this 
would be a tragedy, as great to Main Street as to 
the world. Lewis appears as a distressed and dis- 
gusted idealist, rather than as the cynic claimed by 
his critics. 



Lewis waited two years to bring out a successor to 
"Main Street," and the result, "Babbitt" (1922), is 
called his masterpiece by most of his critics. In this 
novel, Lewis continues his exposure of the sham and 
insincerity present particularly in the bourgeoisie 
ideology . "Babbitt" is the story of George F. Babbitt, 
his home, his family, his friendships, his business 
dealings, his ambitions and his dissipations. He is 
a standardized Good Citizen — he resides in a re- 
spectable neighborhood, provides for his family, 
knows the right sort of people and would not do 
anything especially dishonest. He is even a man of 
some education. But Babbitt also has dreams. The}' 
come to him now and again when he is restless and 
dissatisfied — on the first day of Spring — when 
he is disillusioned with his friends — when work- 
ing and "boosting" do not seem worth the trouble. 
At these times a fairy child comes to him in "a 
dream more romantic than scarlet pagodas by a silver 
sea." And the intrusion of this dream is the real 
scory that Lewis had to tell, for during it, the fairy 
child brings Babbitt his moments of greatness be- 
fore he relapses once more into being a member of 
the "Bunch". It leads him to attempt to avoid his 
bourgeois responsibilities. It kads him to stand 
firml)' by his friend when the latter has violated 
Zenith's code by being unfaithful to and, finally, 
shooting his exasperating wife, although this episode 
does not bring as dire consequences to Babbitt as 
it might have brought. It leads him to a forlorn, 
tawdry affair with the widow, Tanis Judiquem, and 
her disreputable friends. It leads him finally to re- 
pudiate the very standard of all those about him, 
to stand up for liberality in judgment towards 
strikers and radicals and other undesirables (in the 
eyes of the community). However, his brain had 
not been made to direct thought or action unsup- 
ported by the sanction of his group. Although he 
becomes reconciled to his elements and is retaught 
its sterling virtues, he has learned a truth, which 
his fellows will never know existed. In the last 
paragraph of the book, Babbitt hopes wistfully that 
his foolish son may find the way he has somehow 
missed. Unhappily, the reader finds no reasonable 
ground to share this hope. 

George F. Babbitt cannot be written off as a 
caricature, for he was a tragic figure. The man was 
kind; he was pathetic in his efforts to be both happy 
and successful; he was as sincere as he was ludicrous 
in his conviction that he served the community; he 
was completely devoid of self-knowledge except in 



brief, devastating gleams of the truth that he had 
never done what he really wanted; he was com- 
pletely inconsistent in his morals; he was completel) 
bourgeois. 

"Babbitt" is the highest point which Sinclair Lewis 
ever reached. In many ways it is the finest novel 
that has come out of America in this century. For 
here, a novelist has been revealed full of sensitive- 
ness and imaginative perception and has created a 
character among the most noteworthy in modern 
fiction. It is no mean feat to have created a man, 
who in himself comprises the characteristics of a 
type so completely, that the type is thereafter known 
by the man's name. Sinclair Lewis has done this. 
The word "Babbitt" has been added to the English 
vocabulary, as signifying a precise and definite 
personality. 

In "Arrowsmith" (1925), Lewis took a different 
grip on the same American problem. "Arrowsmith" 
is perhaps the best of the American novels dealing 
with the theme of the scientist and the threat that 
commercialism and professional jealousy offer to his 
integrity. Martin Arrowsmith, the hero, is a man 
who aspires to be a physician. In the university he 
comes under the influence of an austere, passionate 
teacher of biology. Max Gottleib, and from him 
imbibes the desire for the pure, devoted life of 
scientific research. Nevertheless, after earning his 
degree, he assumes the practice of medicine in a 
town, the replica of Gopher Prairie, where he en- 
counters many antagonisms. Later, he develops an 
enthusiasm for public health work and accepts a post 
in Zenith as Assistant Director of Public Health. 
Here, too, he finds unsympathetic conditions, greed 
and narrowness. He leaves Zenith for New York 
and accepts a position in the McGurk Institute, a 
famous research center, under his beloved old teach- 
er, Gottleib. Superficially, conditions are now ideal 
for both. Actually, they are the same as before. His 
new colleagues at the McGurk Institute demand re- 
sults, stating that truth is all very well in its place, 
but incidental to the principal business of an- 
nouncing to the world two important discoveries 
per annum. The intrigues and underhanded policies 



of the Midwest are repeated by them in a different 
fashion and on a different scale. Arrowsmith has 
one great adventure, battling with disease in the 
West Indies. During this period he loses his wife. 
He returns to New York, marries a rich woman 
whose code is that of the society interests of the 
McGurk Institute, and finally leaves her to take up 
independent research in the woods, together with a 
red-haired rebel from the Institute, Terry Wickett. 
Arrowsmith does become the scientist he wished to 
be, learning on the way what real service to the 
community means, and the price that has to be paid 
by a searcher for the truth. 

"Arrowsmith" is not the best of Sinclair Lewis' 
books, but it is in some respects the most interesting 
and typical, since it is a recapitulation of all that 
he has written. In it, we find his passion for ex- 
posure of sham and hypocrisy, his powers of analysis 
and observation, his tenderness, his ability to por- 
tray character, and his deep sympathy with all who 
hope to break the shackles of conventional existence. 
The principal theme of the book is obvioush a 
thesis, namely that the impersonal quest for scientific 
truth in a world which judges only bv results, is 
difficult, if not impossible. The conflict lies bervseen 
the searchers for pure truth and those who would 
use the half-perfected results of their ideas in the 
belief that these are 'good enough." 

"Elmer Gantr\" (1927), the most violent and bit- 
ter work that Lewis has written, is a portrait of a 
"Fundamentalist" scoundrel. Gantry is a swine, but 
it is not quite adequate to call him a hypocrite; in 
a way, he is perfectly sincere in his response to 
the ecclesiastical life. But he can neither control his 
passions nor keep his mind off the main chance. The 
grojsness of his nature obviates the pos"sibilit\ of the 
struggle and suffering which might make the study 
of such a temperament in a better or more sensitive 
man really moving. As he kneels in pra\er, on the 
last page of the book, when he is welcomed back 
bv his congregation, after having been 'cleared' of 
the accusation brought against him by a woman, his 
heart fills with gratitude. In the same moment, he 
noiices a new singer in the choir — "a girl with 



— 85 



CL J^MAhisiL, <^joumjmL 



Zy REEVE R. BRENNER 



Wake up in the morning early, 
Drag myself out of bed; 
Dress in anything that's handy. 
(Gosh, I wish I was dead) 

No time for breakfast, got to hurry, 
Have to catch the 8:03; 
Shove myself into the subway. 
(Sardines have nothing over me) 

Dash from building to building, 
Plowing through knee deep snow; 
First to math and then to Spanish. 
(Ugh, ugh, look, me Eskimo) 

It's not that I hate education, 
Only one thing makes me sad; 
With all this rushing, I may never 
Live to be a high-school grad. 




charming ankles and lively eyes, with whom he 
would certainly have to become acquainted." 

This novel exhibits almost none of its author's 
finer powers. He makes his one big mistake in per- 
mitting himself to flame with indignation, but 
despite this defect the book has great interest. The 
author must have enjoyed writing it, for the gusts 
of the vituperative passages could hardly have been 
simulated. 

Sinclair Lewis wrote many other novels, one as 
recently as 1949, but none of these can compare 
with his earlier works. Success had brought deca- 
dence in Lewis' works. A lack of fine workmanship 
is more and more in evidence in the later volumes. 



The reason for the decline of the quality of his 
work is that he was pressed by the publisher and 
a clamorous public, and was not able to labor with 
as much zest and as painstakingly as before. Instead, 
he was forced to work as a special reporter, rushed 
to his job and given no time for revision. 

Sinclair Lewis has pricked the bubble of American 
complacency when we most needed something to 
awaken us, and called us back to the tradition of 
American independence at a time when many of his 
countrymen were not following the path of right- 
eousness. In these capacities — in spite of all limi- 
tations of art and insight — he served his country 
well, and he merits grateful remembrance. 



— 86 — 



THE GOOD OLD DAVS 



By ALLAN J. SCHER 



They reminisce the good old days, 
Of how things used to be; 
The rides to town in one horse drays, 
The apples that were free. 




The cry of, ""Oh for the good old days" 
Has been heard in all the world's stages. 
Uttered with that far-away gaze, 
It's the lament of all the ages. 

It's been said at the end of weary days. 
By the artists, the workers, the tramps; 
And in gutteral tones, through the fire's haze. 
By cavemen, in long forgotten camps. 

But this is the plight of the human race. 
Something by which they are sec 
They obtain comforts at a steady pace, 
— ■ Each, with a sigh of regret. 



Q,^:^^ 



FATE 



By DAVID LEVINE 



I am a lump of dirt 
As you all can see 
Although I hurt none 
All tread on me. 



As men grow mean 
And hearts get hard 
Everything called decent 
Gets black and marred. 



When the glaciers come 
And surely this is no myth 
I find myself imbedded 
In a sedimentary cliff. 



I am a lump of dirt 
As you all can see 
Every human being 
Emanates from me. 



As time marches on 

A blade of grass grows 

As the tides of war turn 

It is crushed under soldiers' toes. 



It's dust to dust 
And ashes to ashes 
When all is destroyed 
B\- Atomic gasses. 



— 87 — 



\< 



^* 



v^ 



\ 



By LARRY SCHINDLER 



VVlTHIN a span of twenty-four hours, the 
flourishing flora of the earth had withered and died, 
and were followed by a series of human deaths. 
Disaster had struck hard. 

Hysteria reigned. A well known New York 
columnist stated that he had reason to belie\ e that 
it was a plot by the Arab-Asian Alliance to conquer 
the world. But he overlooked the fact that Asia 
was no better off. 

Scientists searched feverishly for an answer, and 
finally concluded that a new substance had entered 
the earth's atmosphere. Since the beginning of time, 
air had been composed chiefly of nitrogen, oxygen, 
and some argon, but now, thev agreed, something 
new had been added. 

At first, science tried to eliminate the new sub- 
stance, but in vain. It was impossible to destro\ 
something you knew nothing about. Scientists then 



turned their attention to the manufacture of s\nthetic 
food. In this attempt the^- met with success. Over- 
night the world heaved a sigh of relief. 

But relief was ephemeral. Mankind was suddenly 
finding it harder to breathe. The secondary efiect of 
the destruction of plant life was becoming all too 
apparent. So again the world looked to Pal. Pal had 
saved them once, and, he would have to do it again. 

Clyde Reed, except for a temporary moment of 
trepidation, was relatively free from fear. He had 
faith in Pal's ingenuity. Pal had shown the world how 
to synthesize carbon and hydrogen for food. Now 
Pal would show them how to remove the asphy- 
xiating element from the air. 

The security guard was more than slightly wor- 
ried. "You'd better find the answer soon," he said 
nervously to Clyde, "it's becoming harder to 
breathe." 

Clyde snapped his fingers. "It's simple. We in- 
hale oxygen and e.xhale carbon dioxide. Plant life 
replenishes our supply of ox-ygen. Since this new 
substance is destroying the plants, all we have to do 
is to find a way to take out the excess carbon dioxide 
and replace it with oxygen. The new substance 
doesn't affect human breathing directly at all." 

"Well — ", the guard began. 

"Trust Pal," Clyde said, "Pal will save us." 

"I hope so," said the guard downheartedlv, "I 
hope so." 

Clyde ducked through the open door, picked up 
the day's paper and glanced at it. 12,791 suicides in 
the States alone. The time to find an answer had 
come. It was now or never. 

Pal's real name was General Zigmond Von Reich- 
stag. Pal was a robot. In the vear 1973, after the 
forces of communism and capitalism had literalh- 
torn the world apart with Atom and Hydrogen 



■88- 



Bombs, General Von Reichstag, head of the German 
forces in Poland, in^■ented an omniscient robot who 
would answer all questions put to him. From the 
time of his creation. Pal did what was expected of 
him. In 1975, he called for a peace conference and 
ended the struggle between communism and capital- 
ism. The terms of the peace treaty were written by 
Pal and accepted by both sides in 1976. Since that 
time, peace reigned supreme. 

So thorough was his method of establishing peace 
that for the next 150 years Pal had nothing to do 
but talk about conditions with his caretakers. They 
were all educated men, since a caretaker had to be a 
Doctor of Medicine and a Doctor of Semantics. In 
the year 2316, Clyde Reed had been appointed the 
robot's caretaker. Clyde spent his happiest hours 
debadng various problems with Pal. However, since 
the disaster struck, there was no time for debates. 
Clyde had presented Pal with the new problem and 
Pal discovered a way to make synthetic food. 

Now, Clyde was sure, Pal would find the answer 
to the newest problem. Pal had always come through 
in a pinch, but this time he balked, claiming he did 
not have enough information. Clyde immediately 
called the Universal Scientific Laboratory and asked 
for more facts. He was told that new facts had just 
been received and would be sent immediately. 

While waiting for the delivery, Clyde decided to 
have a discussion with Pal. 

"Let's talk about Darwin," Clyde suggested. 

"All right," answered Pal in a bored tone. 

Clyde was beginning to worry. Pal had never 
asked for additional information, and had never 
acted as he had now. Doubtful about what to do, 
Clyde decided to act as if nothing had happened. 
He began to talk about Darwin and his theory of 
"survival of the fittest." He spoke for almost an 
hour, applying Darwin's theory first to Darwin's 
age and then to his own. 

Pal never interrupted anybody while he talked; 
instead, he listened attentively, making a note of 
every word in his electric brain, eager to learn 
things for future reference. Pal never forgot. 

Clyde was speaking when the two men from the 
Universal Scientific Laboratory entered and turned 
over the information to Clyde. 

The crucial moment had come — there was no 
time for delay; the world desperately waited for the 
answer. Breathing had become a practical impos- 
sibility. Clyde started to read the information to Pal, 
tr\ ins to close his mind to the fear that had en- 



\eloped the world. Personally, Clyde feared noth- 
ing, and placed his complete confidence in Pal. He 
knew all about the information that had been given 
to Pal during the last 343 years. Pal had learned 
much from many generations, and remembered all 
of it. He alone could find the answer. But fear was 
all around Clyde and fear was contagious; today 
Pal had to solve the problem. 

The fact that he remembered Pal's sudden change 
just a few hours earlier, tended to make Clyde 
more nervous. As he read, his nervousness became 
more obvious. But something in him made him go 
en until he finished reading the few pages of in- 
formation to Pal. 

Clyde's eyes were on Pal as the latter digested 
the information given him. The world waited . . . 
the seconds seemed like years. Finall\, Pal spoke, 
uttering but one word, "Darwin." 

"This is no time to finish our discussion," said 
Clyde. Now he was sure of the change that had come 
over Pal. Never before had Pal attempted to change 
the topic. 

"Survival of the fittest," muttered Pal. 

Clyde decided to 
try again. "We've 
got to have better 
air," Clyde whisp- 
ered, appealing to 
Pal's sympathy. 
"You've got to give 
us the answer." 
"Why.'" Pal asked. 

Clyde broke into 
a cold sweat. He 
wished he had been 
born into a poor 
family so he would 
not have been able 
to afford the stud\ 
of Semantics. In 
that case, he woultl 
have been fright- 
ened when everyone 
else was, and would 
have taken his own 
life earlier. I-\en be- 
fore P.il spoke. 
Chde knew wh.it 
he would sa\ . 

"I don't need .lir," 
Pal said. 




— 89 — 










ISRAEL 



^VFTER wandering throughout the world for 
more than two thousand years, the Jew, wherever 
he may be, can now look towards a homeland, a 
place of refuge. He can look with pride at the 
name of Israel, inscribed in three languages on bits 
of paper. These are the young nation's postage 
stamps. They do not merely bear the country's 
name. They depict the story of a people, its strug- 
gles, its contributions to mankind and its fight for 
freedom. They are an outlet to a deeper under- 
standing of the history of the Jewish people, a 
people rich in culture and national heritage. 

The proclamation of Israel's independence was 
heralded to the world on May 14, 1948. A state 
was being reborn. Communications with the rest of 
the world had to continue. The young nation needed 
its own postage stamps. This was foreseen by the 
Provisional State Council, and, on the second day 
of Israel's independence, a set of stamps appeared. 
The stamps pictured 2000-year-old coins, struck in 
the Maccabbean era. The word "Israel" did not 
appear on the stamps, for at the time of their 
preparation the country's name was not decided 
upon. Instead, the words DOAR IVRI (Hebrew 
Post) were inscribed. 

On November 29, 1947 the United Nations Gen- 
eral Assembly voted the Palestine Partition Plan. 
This brought about Arab riots, murders, and finally 
full-scale invasion and war. The Jewish armies faced 
some of the greatest military powers of the Middle 
East. Yet as is well known, the Jews were heroically 
victorious. The war became known as "Israel's War 
of Independence." 

On each anniversary of Israel's Independence, the 
government has issued new stamps, depicting sites 
on which decisive battles were fought. Met2udat 
Yesha and Hakastel are pictured on the first set 
while the second set shows Degania, Safed and Yad 
Mordecai. 

The Yad Mordecai stamp is of particular interest. 
Yad Mordecai, a desert kibbutz in the northern 
Negev, was named in honor of Mordecai Anilewitz, 
a hero of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. The de- 
fenders of Yad Mordecai, surrounded and shelled by 
the Egyptians, held out with severe losses until the 
Israel Army ordered the settlement evacuated. It 
was later recaptured and rebuilt. The stamp shows 
the watertower of Yad Mordecai, destroyed by 
mortar shells, and the new buildings of the re- 
built settlement. 

The realization of the State of Israel did not 






Through Its Stamps 



By EU LAZAR 



come about suddenly. It was the result of an age- 
old dream of great idealists, one of the greatest of 
whom was Theodore Herzl, the founder of Modern 
Zionism. It was Dr. Herzl who initiated the first 
Zionist Congress, held in Basel, Switzerland in 1897. 
After that Congress Dr. Herzl wrote in his diary: 
"If I were to subsume the Basel Congress in one 
word — which I shall not do openly — it would 
he this: at Basel I founded the Jewish State. If 
I were to say this today, I would be met by uni- 
versal laughter. In five years, perhaps, and certainly 
in fifty, every one will see it." Dr. Herzl dedicated 
his life to the ideals of Zionism and it was, there- 
fore, fitting that on the occasion of the 23rd Zionist 
Congress, the first held in independent Israel, in 
1951, his portrait should appear on the first "per- 
sonality" stamp of Israel. 

After the death of Theodore Herzl, it was Dr. 
Chaim Weizmann who was left with the task of 
guiding the destinies of Zion. This he did until 
the very eve of Israel's War of Independence. Un- 
like the other pioneers of Modern Zionism, who did 
not live to see the realization of their dream, Weiz- 
mann received his reward during his lifetime. He 
was granted the great distinction of serving as 
Israel's first President. When Dr. Weizmann passed 
away on November 9, 1952, the Israel Postal De- 
partment, partaking in the mourning of world Jewry, 
issued a set of stamps which bore the portrait of 
Dr. Weizmann with the Presidential Standard. 

Dr. Weizmann, through his scientific discoveries, 
was instrumental in obtaining the Balfour Declara- 
tion, which led eventually to the establishment of 
the State of Israel. Together with Lord Balfour, 
Dr. Weizmann laid the cornerstone for the Hebrew 
University on Mount Scopus. The University has 
since become a center of higher learning, perpetu- 
ating the culture of the Jewish people. The year 
1950 marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
establishment of this institution. On this occasion 
a commemorative stamp was issued, depicting the 
Jewish National and University Library on Mount 
Scopus. 

Unlike other nations which commemorate their 
historic events hundreds of years after their oc- 
currence, the State of Israel portrays its current 
problems on its stamps. First and foremost is the 
problem of immigration. Contrar) to the methods 
of other countries, whose policy is to restrict immi- 
gration, Israel, a comparatively poor and small 
country, has opened its doors wide to allow the 
dispersed remnants of Jewry to enter. On the second 



anniversary of its independence Israel issued a set 
of stamps devoted to immigration. The 20 priitu 
stamp is dedicated to immigration prior to the 
establishment of the Jewish State. The 4 prtttii 
stamp symbolizes the free ingathering of the exiles 
into the independent State. 

Why have Israel's stamps created such wide in- 
terest? Firstly, because these stamps depia the 
spirit of a young nation who had to struggle to 
gain its independence. Secondly, because of their 
high artistic value. The government has employed 
top designers, many of whom have achieved inter- 
national fame. Recently the United Nations spon- 
sored a world-wide contest to choose the best 
designs for its future stamp issues. Out of the 
entries submitted by thirty-two member nations. 
Israel won first prize. The sketch came from Willi 
Wolf Wind of Tel Aviv who has designed many of 
Israel's stamps in collaboration with Yehuda Struski, 
a Tel Aviv painter. 

It has been Israel's custom for the past four years 
to mark the autumn holida}s — Rosh Hashanah, 
Succoth and Simchat Torah — with stamps symboliz- 
ing the spirit of each occasion. In 1951 the govern- 
ment sponsored a contest among Israeli designers, to 
select its annual holiday series. A beautiful Wind- 
Struski set was chosen. The purple 40 prutu stamp 
pictured the Torah Scrolls, while the blue 5 prutci 
denomination features a pair of carrier pigeons. 
Israel's holiday stamps are the only postage stamps 
of any nation to carry holiday greetings. 

One does not necessarily have to be a stamp col- 
lector to appreciate the beauty and value of Israel's 
stamps. They serve to express the feelings, the 
culture, the religion and the history of our people. 
Through them we shall follow the growth of the 
State of Israel. 



Pictures and information about Israel 
Stamps — courtesy of the SUmp 
Youth and Chalutiiut Department 
AKencv for Palestine. 







State 

Scholarship Winners 

This Year 




In line with the fine tradition established since 1949, four years after 
the establishment of our school, this year once again our graduating 
class made a very creditable showing in the Regents Scholarship Exami- 
nation. Winning 6 State Scholarships this year gives Talmudical Academy 
an enviable record of 36 such awards since 1949. This total represents 
17% of our alumni, a figure which compares more than favorably with 
any public or private high school in the State of New York. The winners 
this year were : 

Solomon Feder 

Josef Fischer 

Lionel Grossbard 

Leonard Indyk 

Jacob Lebowitz 

Allan Seller 



Congratulations and best wishes to you. 



The Administration 



— 92 





Compliments of . . . 

Congregation Shomerei Emunah 

14th Avenue & 52nd Street 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



Congregation Sons Of Judah 

5311 - 16th Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



■94 — 





Compliments of . . . 




CONGREGATION 




CHOVEVEI TORAH 




NinxT xna )":;'D'r' in ';n 3in 




Djyiny-is -ivf-DVc mm' 'nv 


FIRST CONGREGATION 


885 Eastern Parkway 


ANSHE SFARD 
OF BORO PARK 


Brooklyn 13, N.Y. 






JUDEA CENTER 


4502 - 14th Avenue 


SYNAGOGUE 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


2059 Bedford Ave. 




Brooklyn 25, N.Y. 




Lipman Weiss, President 




Dr. Meir Felmcm, Rabbi 


Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 


CHEVRA LINAS HATZEDEK 


MINYAN SFARD 


Of Grafton Street 


Of Boro Park 


78 Grafton Street 


803 46th Street 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 




CONGREGATION 


Compliments of . . . 


AGUDATH SHOLOM 


THE TALMUD TORAH 


Of Flatbush 


Of Flatbush 


3714 — 18th Avenue 


1325 Coney Island Avenue 


Brooklyn 18, N. Y, 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 



95 — 



Compliments of . . . 

YESmVA RISHON L'ZION 

409-415 East 95th Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Gilbert L. Steinberg, 
Rabbi 

Catering Facilities Available 



THE LATE MAARIV GROUP 

Congregation Ahavath Israel 

Avenue K & East 29th Street 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Compliments of 



YOUNG ISRAEL OR BORO PARK 



The Graduation Of 

NAHUM 

Mr. 6c Mrs. Isidore Gordon 

& Sons, Nahum, David & Daniel 



Compliments and best wishes to . . . 

Paul Kolker 

from 
Grandma Sarah OrlansJcy 



— 96 — 



Compliments of . 



RAPHAEL, DAVID 
and SHULAMITH LEVINE 



•97 — 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 



Our Nephew 

GILBERT JESSE GOLDFINE 

In Honor of His Graduation 

Herman & Jean Goldfine 
Alex & Ann Goldfine 

Abbe & Gussie Goldfine 

William & Elanor Goldfine 
Sam 6c Ann Tobias 

Al 6c Esther Sorcher 

Sol 6c Rose Horowitz 
Selye Goldfine 
Jean Goldfine 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



Our Grandson and Nephew 

GILBERT JESSE GOLDFINE 

In Honor of His Graduation 

Grandma & Grandpa Yunis 
Jack 6c Ella Yunis 

Alexander & Martha Yunis 
Matthew P. Yunis 
Joe & Leah Horowitz 
Sam 5c Dora Fischer 

Sam 6c Reene Sherman 
Irving & Janet Raclyn 



— 99- 



Friends oi 



ZAVE KUBERSKY 



— 100 — 



I. SHALOM & CO. 

Handkerchiefs 

411 5th Avenue 
New York City 



Congregation B'nai Israel 

of 

Linden Heights 

4502 - 9th Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

BERRIMAN STREET 
LADIES' AUXILIARY 

Lilly Barsky, Pres. 

Fanny Hoffeld, Hon. Pres. 
B. Boardman, Treos. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. <S MRS. 
PHILIP SILVERSTEIN 



Congratulations to . 



JOSEF 

From His Parents, Grandparents, and Brothers 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Fischer 
Mr. and Mrs. Moses Fischer 
Mr. David Ochs 
Harvey & Shlomo 



Best Wishes To Reuben Rudman 

From His Grandmother, Parents, Aunts, Uncles & Cousins 

Mrs. Esther A. Hurv^^itz Rabbi & Mrs. Joseph T. Rudman 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Wachsman Rabbi & Mrs. Nathan Glustem 
Larry, Raphael and Philip Mischa, Ira and Norman 

Rabbi & Mrs. Judah Lowensohn Mr. & Mrs. Leo Levine 
Rose Judith and Stephen 

Mr. & Mrs. Irving Friedman 

Alfred, Moish and Debby ^ _ 



102- 



In honor of . 



Raphael's Graduation 

from 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Greenberg 



Congratulations to 



STUART 

On His Graduation 

from 
His Grandparents & Parents 



Best Wishes to . . . 

Reuben M. Rudman 

Universal Dyeing & Finishing Mills 
I. Shenck Corrado Porto 



Congratulations to 



MELVIN 

On His Graduation 



Grandmother 



In honor of . . . 

The Graduation of their Son 

MICHA 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel Botknechl 



— 103 ■ 



Besi Wishes to . . . 

Micha Botknecht 


In honor of . . . 


from 


Our Nephew 


DR. & MRS. H. S. FRANK 
and DAUGHTERS 


PfflUP FELIG 


GLORIA, ANITA, and DEBORAH 

(Humor Editor of Elchanite — 1930) 


Mr. and Mrs. Morris Horn 


Congratulations to . . . 




Our Son 




MORTON 


JACK FURMANSKY 


Upon His Graduation 




Mr. and Mrs. A. Bluth and Family 




Congratulations to . . . 


Congratulations to . . . 


JACK & REEVE 

On Their Graduation 


COLE 

On His Graduation 




from 


Uncle Murray 


His Parents 
Bernie and Fannie Genn 


Best Wishes to . . . 




MEYER EDELSTEIN 


Best Wishes to . . . 


from 
Congregation Petrekoff Anshe Sfard 


Our Dear Son and Brother 


Of Brownsville 

493-495 Herd Street 


GTT.RERT J. GOLDFINE 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Louis Bromberg, President 


Mother, Dad, and Phyllis 



— 104- 



Best Wishes to . . . 


Best Wishes 

For a Successful Future to 


GILBERT J. GOLDFINE 


Our Son 

PAUL 


Rivka Rivinsky Family Circle 


Mr. and Mrs. Morris Kolker 
Harvey and Robin 


In honor of . . . 


Congratulations to . . . 


The Graduation of 






JACOB 


NAHUM 






Upon His Graduation 


from 




His Grandparents 


from 


Rabbi and Mrs. L. Stem 


Mom and Dad 


Congratulations to . . . 




Our Son 


RONALD MEYERS 


LEONARD 




Mother, Dad and Robbie 






To 


In honor of . . . 




LEONARD INDYK 


RONALD MEYERS 


Manhattan Beach Jewish Center 






From a Friend 



— 105- 



Congratulations to . . . 
Our Son 

HERMAN 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Pollock 



Best Wishes to . . . 

HERBERT 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Z. Rothman 



Congratulations to . . . 



HERBERT ROTHMAN 



from 



H. Resnek 



Congratulations to . . . 
Our Son 

ARTHUR 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Rozman 



Congratulations to . . . 
Our Son 

STANLEY 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Schimmel 



Congratulations to 



ZALMAN 

Upon His Graduation 



from 



Lil and Mai 



To Our Brother 

ITZY 

On his graduation 

May this mark the beginning in your 

endeavors for great scholastic 

achievements and Jewish 

wisdom 

Rabbi and Mrs. Isaac N. Lerer 

La Crosse, Wisconsin 



Best Wishes to . . . 



IVAN 

Upon His Graduation 

Mother, Dad, and Sara 



— 106- 



Congratulations to 



Our Son 

NORMAN 

Mr. and Mrs. Sinowitz 



To 



JULIUS 



Best Wishes 
from 
Father and Mother 



Congratulations to . . . 

LOUIS 

from 
Mom, Dad, Moishe and Tena 



Congratulations to . . . 

MELVIN 

Upon His Graduation 

Uncle Sam 
Aunt Laura 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARTIN ASKOWITZ 

The Nicest Heel in T. A. 

from 

EppY Shoes 

251 Utica Avenue 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 

The Graduating Class of 1953 

FROM THE KINGSMEN 

Martin Askowitz, Harvey Shap- 
iro, Gil Goldfine, Barry Hoch- 
dorf, Herby Kriegsman, Sandy 
Feit, Larry Schindler, Lionel 
Grossbard, Ivan Serchuk, Phil 
Banner, Martin Greenspan, Har- 
old Udewitz. 



To the Graduates 



CHAVERIM OF BNEI AKIVA 



V'lvsn nx 1:21 iM' 



Best Wishes to . 



HAROLD UDEWITZ 



The Kaplan Berman Foundation 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARTIN ASKOWITZ 

"The Physical Culture Boy" 
from Physical Culture Shoes 

291 Utica Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARTIN ASKOWITZ 

A Graduate Full of Vim, Vigor and 
Vitality 
from 
The House of Vitamins 



— 107 — 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARTIN ASKOWITZ 

A Very Photogenic Lad 

from Renard Photographers 

289 Utica Avenue 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



In honor of . . . 

Our Grandson 

M. DAVID BAKER 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Friedman 



Our Son 

M. DAVID BAKER 

Mother and Dad 



Congratulations to . . . 

PHIL BANNER 

from 
Mother, Dad and Brother Arthur 



Best Wishes to . . . 

PHIL BANNER 

from 
Mr. and Mrs. Jock Wieselman and Family 



FRIENDS OF 
JACOB BECKER 



Congratulations 


to . . . 




JACOB 


Upon 


His Graduation 


The I 


otkowitz Family 


Congratulations 


to . . . 




JACKIE 




from 




Family 



Heartiest Congratulations to . . . 

EPHRAIM BECKMAN 

On His Graduation 
A Shaffir 



Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Belenken 
Congratulate 

REEVE BRENNER 

On His Graduation 



Compliments to . . . 

SOLOMON 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. David Spindell 

100 Linden Blvd. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 

SANDY 

Upon His Graduation 
Grandma Ray 



In honor of . . . 

The Graduation of My Nephew 
SANFORD FEIT 

Auntie Bebe 



Congratulations to . . . 

SANDY 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mom, Dad, and Harriet 



In honor of . . . 

The Graduation of 

SANFORD FEIT 

Felt & Joffee 



Congratulations to . . . 

SANFORD FEIT 

May G-d's blessings accompany you 

on your way. 

Roberta L. Zuckerberg and Hyam 



108 — 



Compliments to 

PHILIP FELIG 

On His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Jablov/itz 



Compliments to . . . 

PHILIP FEUG 

On His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Levine 

4616 — 16th Ave. Brooklyn 



Congratulations to . . , 

HERBERT 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fleischer 

Vivian and Julius 



Best Wishes to . . . 

HERBERT FLEISCHER 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Aunt Fannie and Grandfather 



Congratulations to . . . 

My Grandson 

EDWARD 

On His Graduation 
Mrs. Rose Glick 



Congratulations and best virishes to 
Our Dear Son 

EDWARD A. GUCK 

On His Graduation 

Love 

Mother and Dad 



Congratulations to . . . 

OUR SON ABE 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. lacob Guttmar 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. <S MRS. lOSEPH HYMOWITZ 
and ZEV 



Best of luck to . . . 

Our Grandson 

LEONARD 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Zausner 



Mazel Tov to . . . 

Our Grandson 

LEONARD 

Rev. and Mrs. Jacob Indyk 



Congratulations to , , . 

LEONARD 

On His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Indyk 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. ISAAK KANAREK 



Compliments of . . . 

THE KANAREK FAMILY 



AN UNCLE OF 
DAVID KOLATCH 



Congratulations to . . 

RICKY KURTZ 

from 
A Friend 



3est wishes to . . . 

MITCHELL LEIFER 

Iron: 
A Friend 



— 109 — 



Congratulations to . . . 

JACKIE 

from 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jacobson 
Strawberry Mansion 
Lake Mohecan, N.Y. 



With best Wishes to . . . 

ERVIN 

On His Graduation 
from ■ 
His Parents, Brother and Grandmother 



Best Wishes to . - . 

ERVIN PREIS 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Edison 



Good Luck to . . . 

REUBEN RUDMAN 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

A Friend 



Congratulations 

HERBERT 

from 
Mom and Dad 



Compliments to . . . 

HERBERT ROTHMAN 

from 
Mr. Irving Flomholtz 



To 

REUBEN RUDMAN 

Best Wishes for a Successful Future 
Mr. and Mrs. David Fogel and Children 



Best Wishes to . . . 

Our Son 
ALLAN 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. David E. Scher 



A FRIEND OF 
ALLAN SCHER 



LARRY SCHINDLER 

On His Graduation 

from 

Mother, Father and Brother 



Congratulations io . . . 

Our Grandson 

LARRY SCHINDLER 

On His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Bodner 



Congratulations to . . . 

ZALMAN SCHRADER 

from 
Stephen 



Compliments of . . 

MR. & MRS. GEORGE SCHWARTZ 

Upon the Graduation of 
Their Son Irving 



MR. & MRS. H. GREENSTEIN 

In Honor of the Graduation 
Of their Grandson 

rrzY 



Best 'Vi''ishes to . 

IRVING SCHWARTZ 

from 

Empire Leather Co. 

101 Gold Street New York City 



In honor of . . . 

IVAN 

The Graduation of Our Nephew 
Mr. and Mrs. J, Serchuk and Barnett 



110 



Lots of Luck to . . . 

Our Nephew 

IVAN SERCHUK 

Mr, & Mrs. Paul Davis & Family 



Best Wishes to . . . 

IVAN 

Aunt Mae and Uncle Phil 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SILVERSTEIN 
& SAMUEL 

In Honor Of 
Joseph's Graduation 



Best Wishes to . . . 

JULIUS 

Upon His Graduation 

Uncle Louis & Cousin Anita 



Good Luck to . . . 



OUR NEPHEW JULIUS 

Uncle Gus & Aunt Fannie 



Congratulations to . . . 

JULIUS 

On His Graduation 

from 

Uncle Sam & Aunt Ida 



Compliments of . . . 

WALT 

from 
Mom, Dad, Stan & Danny 



A Hearty 2112 'i'TD 

To Our Grandson 

?l5iN11 T'? 

On His Graduation 

from 

Mr. & Mrs. Israel Sussman 



Congratulations to . . . 

Our Son 

SOLOMON 

On His Graduation 
Mr. & Mrs. Max Feder 



In Honor of . . . 

OUR SON HAROLD'S 
GRADUATION 

Mr. <S Mrs. Bernard Udewitz 



Best Wishes to . . . 

LOUIS 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

His Friends 



Congratulations to . . . 
LOUIS 
Upon His Graduation 
Mr. Charles Glass 



Congratulations to . . . 

ALL BOYS 

from 
A Friend 



Best Wishes to . . , 

ALL THE GRADUATES 

From A Former Graduate 
Sheldon Rudoff 



Congratulations to . . . 

JACOB J. BLAZER 

On His Graduation 



In Memory of . . . 

Our Beloved Parent.-; 

FAVISH <S BRANE FEDER 
from 

Their Children 



111 — 



The Graduating Class of June, 1953 expresses its 
deepest sympathy to classmate 



JOSEPH KURTZ 



on the passing of his beloved father Kalman 



112- 



In Memory of . . . 



My Grandparents 



NATHAN & SARAH SHARASHOFF 



Allen Heifer 



— 1 1 : '. — 



in Memory of . 



Our Beloved Father & Mother 



EPHRAIM & ANNA BECKMAN 



Beckman Family 



In Memory of 



NATHAN COHEN 



Beloved Father and Grandfather 



114 — 



-.yEUQ ^VD'; VDys 



In Memory of . . . 

RUBIN ORLANSKY 

Beloved Father and Grandfather 

Sylvia, Sol, and Irin Buchvifald 



In Memory of . . . 
Our Beloved Mother and Grandmother 

MRS. RACHEL WAXMAN 



In Memory of . . . 

HYMAN RESNIKOFF 

Grandfather of Herman Pollock 



In Memory of . . . 

NOCHIM IDL HOFFMAN 



In Memory of . . . 

My Dear Departed Grandparents 
And Uncle 

ETA. SAM & MOE FEIT 

Sanlord Fell 



In Memory of . . . 

Our Beloved Parents 

ABRAHAM <S ANNA BASH 

Herman and Sadie Bash 



In Memory of 



SAMUEL & FANNIE NOVAK 



In Loving Memory 

WOLF AND HANNAH BLAZER 



!n Loving Memory of . , . 

ELCHANAN & CHAYN STIMLER 



— 115 — 



Compliments of 



MR, & MRS. SAM KLEIN 



2227 - 28th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



— 116 — 



In Honor of . . . 


Mr. & Mrs. Held's Son's Recovery 


Ladies Auxiliary 


Beth Aaron of Flatbush 


Compliments of . . . 


Joseph Rosenzweig 


Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 




MR. & MRS. 


MR. & MRS. S. H. CHERTOFF 


JACOB GLOBE & RENA 


From 






MR. & MRS. 


JEROME FISHER 


DAVID S. HAMMERMAN 




and SONS 



117 



Mazel tov to . . . 

Our Efficient Bookkeeper 

ARLENE M. HIRSCHHORN 

On Her Marriage to 
Nathan Stillman 

J. Malick and Sons 



Congratulations to . 



RABBI KARLIN 

from 
His Class and a Friend 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

HAROLD KIRSH 

from 
Uncle Sam and Aunt Sadie 



MR. & MRS. 

JACOB KESTENBAUM 

and FAMILY 



MR. & MRS. 

AARON NEUSTADTER 

and FAMILY 



MR. & MRS. LEON SHIPPER 
and SHELLY 





Compliments of . . . 


MR. & MRS. 


REINER & SINGER 


PHILIP KESTENBAUM 


Furriers 


and FAMILY 


27 East Broadway 




New York, N.Y. 



118 



Complirnents of . . . 


To 


JACK WALKER 


MANDELL GANCHROW 


3801 Quentin Rd. 


from 


Brooklyn 34, N.Y. 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Woil 




Compliments of . 


Compliments of . . . 


MR. & MRS. M. BLUTH 


MR. HARRIS WEINSTEIN 


and FAMILY 






Compliments oi . . . 




MR. & MRS. MAX ELKDMS 


Compliments of . . 




MR. & MRS. ISAAC BAKAL 


Compliments of . . . 


and Son JOSEPH 




2314 Strauss Street 
Brooklyn 12, N.Y. 


ELISHA & ZAHAVA FISCH 


Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 


MR. & MRS. MAX BERLIN 




115 Lee Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 


MR. M. FLASCHER 


Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 


RABBI BERNALD L. BERZON 




and FAMILY 


A FRIEND 




M. & MRS. WILL FRIEND & SONS 


DR. & MRS. O. H. BLOOM 


5502 — 14lh Avenue 




Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 



— 119 ^- 



FRIENDS OF THE LEVINE'S 


MR. & MRS. ISRAEL GROSSMAN 


Sheldons Grandfather 


1152 52nd Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 


Compliments of . . . 


THE HAUSMANS 




395 Crown Street 


MR. SAMUEL FURMAN 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 




Congratulations to . . . 


A Friend of 


On The Birthday Of A Grandchild To 




MR. & MRS. HELD 


RICHARD GARBER 


Ladies Auxiliary 




Beth Aaron Of Flatbush 


Complim.ents of , . . 


Compliments of . . . 




MR. & MRS. HAROLD JACOBS 


LEONARD & ISIDORE GOLDBERG 


and FAMILY 


Compliments of . . . 


CompHments of . . . 


RABBI & MRS. LEWIS GOLDBERG 


MR. & MRS. WOLF KLARISTENFELD 


and FAMILY 


and FAMILY 


Compliments of . . . 




DAVID GREENFIELD 

1335 - 47th Street 


FRIEND OF LAPIDUS 


Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 




MR. & MRS. mVING H. GROSS 






Compliments of . . . 


1439 45th Street 




Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 


LIFSCHITZ & LIFSCHITZ 


Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 




MR. & MRS. CHARLES USS, 


MR. & MRS. GROSSMAN & SON 


NORMAN & SYLVLA 



120 — 



Compliments ol 



MENDEL 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. E. NEUSTADTER 



Compliments oi . . . 

NATHAN PAIKIN 

996 Sutter Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Friends of The 



ROTHS 

MR. & MRS. JACK SABITH 
and DEBBY 



Ccmpliments of . . . 

MR. JOSEPH mA SALZMAN 
and FAMILY 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SELKOWITZ 

3511 Dekalb Avenue 
Bronz, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

H. B. SPATT 



STEVEN 

from 
Mom, Dad and Grandmother 



Compliments of . . . 

JOSEPH ZELLER 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. PHILIP FEIN 
and FAMILY 

1484 E. 24th St. 
Brooklyn 29, N.Y. 



ARTHUR STUDIOS. Inc. 

49 West 46th Street 
New York 19, N.Y. 



Compliments of 



MR. CANTOR & MR. BECKER 



Atlas Coat Front Co., Inc. 



V2\ 



Chalfin Foundation 



318 West 39th Street New York City 



ACME FOLDING BOX CO., Inc. 

149 East 26th Street New York 10, New York 

MUrray Hill 9-5525 

"Manufacturers And Designers 
Of Quality Folding Cartons." 



Dickens 5-5810 

Areola Plumbing & Heating Inc. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 

1640 Eastern Parkway Brooklyn 33, N. Y. 

Licensed Oil Burner Installation 

833 Evergreen Drive West Hempstead, N. Y. 

Oil Burner License No. 1128 

Licensed Throughout Nassau County 



— 122 



Flatbush Hardware Store 

Julius J. Goldberg, Proprietor 

Toys - Games - Hardware - Housefurnishings 

Cutlery - Electrical Supplies - General Repair 

967 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 

Telephone: BUckminster 2-5949 



Yeshivah University Women's Organization 

BROOKLYN DIVISION 

Mrs. Murray Rothman, President 
Mrs. H. Sherman, Secretary 



GARTENBERG'S & SCHECHTER'S 

Pioneer Country Club 

Greenfield Park, N. Y. 

All Outdoor 6c Indoor Sports - Filtered Pool 

Nightly Entertainment - Private Mile Long Lake 

9 Hole Golf Course - Sabbath & Kashruth Strictly Observed 

Winter Resort: Hotel Edward, Miami Beach, Florida 



Compliments of . . . 

BERDIE'S CORSET SHOP 

384 Kingston Avenue 
Brooklyn 25, N.Y. 



BERT & HELEN'S 
CANDY STORE 

"Service With a Smile" 
Bedford Ave., Corner President St. 



Compliments of . . . 


Saul Grossman GRamercy 8-5985 


BESTFORM FOUNDATIONS. 


EASTERN MUSIC COMPANY 


Inc. 




64 - 74 West 23rd Street 


Musical Instruments 


New York City 


34 Third Avenue at 9th St, 
New York 3, N.Y. 


Greetings from . . . 

BLOCK PUBLISHING CO. 


Compliments of . . . 


Since 1854 

America's Headquarters of Hebrica 

and Judaica 

Send for Catalogues and Bloch's 

Book Bulletin 

31 West 31st St. 

New York 1, N.Y. 


ELITE ISRAEL 

Famous Candy and Chocolate 

Manufacturers 
(For All Year And Passover) 


Approaching A Century Of Jewish 
Publishing In The U. S. 


Ramat Gem, Israel 




Compliments of . . . 


BORO FUEL OIL CO. 


FALECK & MARGOLES 


2 Church Avenue 


Wholesale Jewels 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


7 West 45th St. 




New York, N.Y. 


BArclay 7 - 7844 


FEIGER ELECTRIC CO. 


BRYANT FABRICS. Inc. 


Maintenance 


Converters of Bry-Tex Cottons and 




Rayons 


Wiring For Light and Power 


350 Broadway 
New York 13, N.Y. 


nil Lincoln Place 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



124- 



Compliments of . . . 

GANSVOORT PRODUCT 
CO., Inc. 

100-108 Horatio Street 
New York, N.Y. 




GEORGIA LEATHER CO. 


INDUSTRIAL CONTAINER 




CORPORATION 


Nuttman Street 


Second Avenue and 50th Street 


Newark, New Jersey 


Brooklyn 32, N.Y. 


Compliments of . . . 


STEPHEN KANITZ 


HELLER CANDY CO.. Inc. 


Insurance Broker 


Manufacturers of Quality Candies 


75 Fulton Street 


For Passover and All Year Round 


New York City 


132 Beckwith Avenue 
Paterson 3, NJ. 


WO 4-6953 
All Kinds Of Insurance 


Knishes . . .? 


KINGS CARD & PAPER 


Any Party . , .? 


CO., Inc. 


Let HERSHFS KNISHOP 




Cater It For You 


Paper — Cardboard 


HERSHI'S KNISHOP. Inc. 


Cut Cards — Envelopes 


4903 -12 Ave. 


198 Broome Street, N, Y. C. 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


ROegon 4-1885 



Locks - Furniture - Refrigerator 
and Cabinet Hardware 

A. L. LIEBMAN & SON, Inc. 

2046 McDonald Avenue 

Brooklyn 23, N. Y. 

A. L Liebman ESplanade 5-8100 



MA^fHATTAN-KREALE PROD., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

JACK & JILL BUBBLE SET 

172 North 10 Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Compliments of 



Compliments and blessings of . . . 

MR. & MRS. ISAAC MANKUTA 



Sales Manager of 

Rokeach Sales Corp. 

Manufacturers of Kosher Products 



Best Wishes from 



MERIT PAPER CORP. 



Brooklyn, N.Y. 



QUICK FREEZING 
FOOD CORP. 

1802 Third Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 



RAMBAM CATERERS, Inc. 

3121 Kings Highway 

Weltman <S Son 

Caterers of Distinction 



Compliments of . . . 

REBECCA CHARITY FUND, 
Inc. 



D. RICHER 

Specializing in Fresh Jersey Eggs 

892 Troy Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



126 - 





STerling 3 - 8787 


ROYAL LAMP COMPANY 


MOBILGAS 


New York City 


TOPS SERVICE STATION 




"Tops Them All" 




1082 Union Street 


M. Hornblass, Prop. 


Cor. Bedford Ave. 




Brooklyn 25, N.Y. 


Compliments of . . . 




SABROSA COFFEE CO.. Inc. 


TREBOR KNITTING MILLS 




250 — 44 Street 


129 Maiden Lane 
New York, N.Y. 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 




Compliments of . . . 


LOUIS J. SEPTIMUS & CO. 




Certified Public Accountants 


VIVIAN DRESS COMPANY 


335 Broadway 
New York City 


501 — 7th Avenue 
New York City 


SAM STEGINSKY 




Strictly Kosher 


WEINSTEIN BROTHERS 


Meat And Poultry Market 


Coats 


954 Nostrand Avenue 


512 — 7th Avenue 


Tel. PResident 3-0086 





H. WOOL & SONS, INC. 

Butter - Eggs - Cheese 

137 Reade Street 
New York, N.Y. 



GEdney 8-9888-9271 

AABON'S FISH MARKETS 

Hotels & Restaurants Supplied 
A Full Line of Smoked Fish every Saturday 
4024 13th Ave. 421 Ditmas Ave. 

Free Delivery Brooklyn, N.Y. 



BArclay 7-8918-9 
ATLANTIC CLOTHING CO., luc. 

Manufacturers of 

"Allen Park" — "Baychester" 

Morris Jaffe 

1 Allen Street New York 2, N.Y. 



AMSTELO DAMIA DIAMOND CO. 

10 West 47th Street 
New York, N.Y. 



BARZEL CO. 



Hardware, Houseware, Venetian Blinds 
and Linoleum 



115 Lee Ave. 
Free Delivery 



Brooklyn 11, N.Y. 
EVergreen 4-5571 



Tel. GEdney 8-27B4 

BECKER'S CLOTHES 

For Young Men and Boys 

Closed Saturdays 

Open Sat. Evenings and Sundays 

4213 13 Ave., Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 

Bet. 42 & 43 Sts. 



GEdney 6-8418 

BERNATH FRIEDLANDER 

Optometrist 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

1070 - 45th St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

At Ft. Hamilton Pkway. 



GRamercy 5-3034 

BIRNBAUM'S WINERY 
(Crystal Wine Co.) 

Pure & Kosher Grape Wines 
179 East Broadway New York 2, N.Y. 



BLECKBERG PLUMBING SUPPLY, 
Inc. 

331 Sutter Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



To My Friends 

EDWARD I. BURNS 

Accordion Instructor 

1531 48th Street Brooklyn, N.Y. 

ULster 3-4431 



Compliments of . . . 

CAMP MONROE 

Monroe, N.Y. 



HYacinth 8-6345 

CERTIHED BARRE GRANITE CORP. 

Barre Guild 

Monuments 

Al Lefkowitz 

391 Rockaway Avenue, Brooklyn 12, N.Y. 



CHICFORM 



CLINTON PLAZA 

Fine Caterers 

Under Direct Supervision of 

Chaim Lichtenstein 



UL. 9-0131 Repairs & Sales 

COOKIES 
RADIO & TELEVISION, Inc. 

1174 Coney Island Ave. 
Kent Theatre Building Brooklyn 30, N.Y. 



— 128 — 



CO-ORDINATED ADVERTISING 
CORP. 

9 East 38th Street 
New York 16, N.Y. 



CROWN SELF SERVICE 

(Lou and Ted) 

315 Rogers Avenue 

Corner Montgomery Street 

PR. 8-3688 



EVergreen 4-9019 
DAVE'S COMMUNITY GARAGE 

Day and Night Parking 

Cars Serviced 

Dove Perlowitz, Mgr. 

So. 8th St. cor. Roebling St. 

Brooklyn 11, N.Y. 



DYCKMAN'S 

73 West 47th St. 
New York 19, N.Y. 



EASTERN FARM PRODUCTS 

390 Oakland Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

EVER-READY FOOD CORP. 

54 West 3rd Street 
New York, N.Y. 



EVergreen 7-4490 

F. L. NAGEL'S PHARMACY 

Cor. Lee Ave. & Hooper St. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. ROBERT FEINGOLD 



GRamercy 7-7492 

MATHIAS FISCHER 

Custom Made Orthopedic Shoes 
152 Second Ave. New York 3, N.Y. 



EVergreen 8-2653 

FALUM AND NASS 

Appetizers and Food Specialties 

A Complete Line of Dietetic Foods 

127 Lee Avenue Brooklyn 11, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

FREILICH'S FOOD CENTER 

4403 — 8th Avenue 
Brooklyn 20, N.Y. 



S. FRIEDMAN 

Meat & Poultry Market 
4714 New Utrecht Ave. 
Bet. 47th and 48th Sts. 
Phone: GEdney 6-9151 



Advertising 
FURMAN, ROTH & COMPANY 

117 West 46th Street, New York 36 
PLaza 7-7393 



GANELES - LENGER WINE CORP. 

136 Ludlow Street, N.Y.C. 
GRamercy 7-5797 



SAMUEL GOLD 

Foot Comfort Shop 

84 First Ave. 
New York 3, N.Y. 



EVergreen 7-253S 

HEWES STREET LIVE POULTRY 

MARKET 

328 Hewes Street, Brooklyn 1 1 ,N.Y. 

Near Broadway 



— 129- 



GEdney d-3311 



M. INDICH 

Kosher 
Meat and Poultry M- 



1475 42nd Street 



ket 
Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 



ISRAEL COIN DISTRIBUTION CORP. 

27 Fourth Avenue 

New York 10, N.Y. 

Israel Coin Jewelry for Men 

Women and Children 



JACK'S 

Quality Fruits & Vegetables 

Received Daily 
5009 13th Ave. Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Dickens 2-0481-5385 

JACOB'S HARDWARE CO. 

Builders Hardware and Tools 

Factory and Mill Supplies 

315 Sutter Avenue, Brooklyn 12, N.Y. 

Cor. Osborn St. 



KINGS COUNTY SUPPLY CO. 

115 Manhattan Ave. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



KIRSCHENBAUM BROS., Inc. 

Funeral Directors 

WESTMINSTER CHAPELS 

1153 - 63 Coney Island Ave. At Ave. H 

Brooklyn 30, N.Y. 

Ulster 9-2020 

Branch: 345 Throop Ave — MA. 2-1066 



KRESNERS POULTRY FARMS 

Freehold, N.J. 

476 Alabama Ave. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



LASKER BROTHERS 

Wholesale 

Coats, Suits, & Dresses 

50 East Broadway 

New York 2, N.Y. 



CAnal 6-8971 

LERNER & COOPER 

Ladies' Apparel 
Boys' and Girls' Clothing 



LORTWAY LAUNDRY, Inc. 

417 — 90th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Copmlete Laundry Service 

SH. 5-3131 



LAckawanna 4-7142-3 

NAGOURNEY & YUDIS 

Manufacturing Furriers 
242 West 30th St. New York 1, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. WACHTEL 

National Button Co. 



Dickens 2-8400 HYacinth S-5359 

PARADISE CATERERS, Inc. 

Strictly Kosher Caterers 

Rev. Norman Muchnick 

1530 Pitkin Avenue, Brooklyn 12, NY. 



Compliments of . . . 
PARAMOUNT THREAD CO., Inc. 

151 West 26th St. 
New York City 



Compliments of . . . 

PAUL'S SERVICE STATION 

7015 Bay Parkway 

Kings Highway & Ocean Parkway 

Best Service At All Times 



PENN'S FOOD STORES 

1205 Avenue N 



— 130 — 



WAlker 5-3773 

NATHAN POILETMAN SONS 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Wholesale Furniture 

Showrooms 

30 East Broadway 

New York 2, N.Y. 



BEachview 2-3066 BEnsonhurst 6-5405 

PRINCETON MATTRESS CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Mattresses, Box Springs & Studio Couches 
1751 - 3 Bath Ave. Brooklyn 14, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

RAIR PRICE WINDOW CLEANING 
CO. 

152 West 42nd Street 
New York 18, N.Y. 



REGENT - MAJOR CORP. 



496 Broadway 



C. Halbfinger 
RELIABLE TOY & STATIONERY CO. 

182 Utica Ave. 
Brooklyn 13, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

Ike Rosenberg 

CAIRO FABRICS 

9 East 20th Street 
New York City 



ROXY WINDOW CLEANING CO. 

233 West 42nd Street 
New York City 



RUBIN TEXTILE COMPANY 

7 East Broadway 
New York City 
COrtlond 7-1858 



Compliments of . . . 

SCHERTZ'S BAKERY 

1022 — 43rd Street 
Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . , 

SCHNALL PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers of 
Tam Tov Kosher Cheese 



SCHRAETER'S 

5415 14th Ave. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Weddings — Bar Mitzvahs 

Social Functions 



SEMEL & SON 

Self Service Food Center 

5013 — 13th Avenue 

Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 



Evergreen 7-8298 Cash or Credit 

SIMON SINGER 

Men's, Young Men's & Boys' Clothing 
35-37 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 



SPEEDWAY FOOD STORES 

807 Stanley Avenue 
840 East New York Avenue 



STAR 
KOSHER SOAP & CANDLE CO. 



Ephraim Stem 

GLATT KOSHER MEATS & 

POULTRY 

4618 Churcii Avenue 

Bet. East 46th St. & East 47lh St. 

Brooklyn 3, N.Y. 



— 131 



SWEE-TOUCH-NEE TEA 

Is Good Tea 

On Sale at all Grocers and Delicatessens 

Consolidated Tea Co. 

185 Division Street 

New York 2, N.Y. 



I. TRACHTMAN'S 

Prescription Drug Store 
4301 10th Ave., Cor. 43rd Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
GE. 8-9308-9577 UL. 4- 



UNITED OUTFITTERS, Inc. 

135 Graham Ave. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . - 

UNIVERSAL CREATIONS 

Mr. Samuel Dansker 
Mr. H. S. laas 



Compliments of . . . 

BAER BROS. DRESSES, Inc. 

1400 Broadway 
New York City 



Te: 



GEdney 6-9129 

WEINSTEIN'S 

Appetizers — Gift Baskets 

"Famous for Creamed Herring" 

Al Weinstein — Frank Kachmctn 

4510 Ft. Hamilton Parkway, B'klyn 19, N.Y. 



ARTHUR WEINSTOCK 

STRICTLY KOSHER PRIME MEATS 

& POULTRY 

792 Prospect PL, Near Nostrand Ave. 

Brooklyn 16, N.Y. 

Phone: STiUwell 3-2827 



Compliments of . . . 

WILLIE'S HIGH-GRADE DAIRY 

761/2 Belmont Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



WORLD CLOTHING EXCHANGE 

832 Broadway 
New York 3, N.Y. 



WORTH & NASCH 

General Wholesalers 
23 Allen Street 
New York, N.Y. 



YOUNG'S HOSIERY CO. 

Wholesale Hosiery & Underwear 
319 Grand Street 
New York, N.Y. 



Greetings from . . . 

ZARETSKY'S 

Curtain & Linen Shop 
181 Orchard Street, New York 2, N.Y. 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. 
JOSEPH L. ROSENBERG 



WEITZMAN ENTERPRISES, Inc. 

Industrial Engineering Contractors 

Factory Planning, Equipments and 

Installations 

Carpenters - Masons - Plumbers 

6 Bond Street New York 12, N.Y. 

ORegon 7-4310-4311 



Compliments of 



RABBI & MRS. EMANUEL LAZAR 
ELI & DAVID 



683 Essex St. 



Brooklyn 8, N.Y. 



— 132 — 





Compliments of . . . 


Mr. I. Ader 




A Friend 


Adest & Sons 




Mr. and Mrs. Glassman 


Art Press 




S. Goldberg 


Mr. I. Auerbach 




Goldcraft Hosiery Co. 


B & M Sweet Shop 




Nettie Goldrich 


Paul Bindiger 




Goldman's Fruit Store 


Mr. and Mrs. David Birnbaum 


Gratt's Fruit and Vegetable Market 


& Family 




Max Greenspan 


William Blitz 




Mr. Freedman & Al Harsh 


Brauman & Rose Kosher 
& Poultry 


Meat 


Honft's Grocery 


Reeve Brenner 




Fat Hoiman 


David Bronner & Co. 




1. G. Lamp Mfg. Co. 


Brooklyn Paint Supply Co. 


Irving & Abe Fruit Store 


Brooks Pharmacy 




Jack Isseroff 


Sam Bucher 




S. Jablowitz 


Eddie Caroso 




B. Jaffe 


Louis Cohen 




Ja-Hy Meats and Poultry 


M. Davidson 




Habers Hardware Store 


Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Deutsch 


Hi-Joe Fruit Market 


Economy Fruit Market 




Joe's Fruit Market 


Miss Rhoda Ehre 




Margo, Carl & Steven Jossem 


Elwood Haberdashers 




Mr. Eugene Jutkowitz 


Dr. and Mrs. H. I, Falk 




Arthur Katz, Pharmacist & Chemist 


Harriet Feit 




Mr. and Mrs. S. Kaufman 


Imkar Co. 




King De King's Food Center 


Joe & Al Fish Store 




Kramer's Bake Shop 


Feldman's Grocery Store 




Emanuel Leibowitz 


Jack Furmansky 




Mr. Joseph Levine 



1. •',:', 



Compliments of . . . 


Hyman Levy 


Mr. and Mrs. Abe Schonhaut 


Rabbi Irwin Levy 


Samuel Shapiro 


Albert Loew 


Sol Shapiro 


Jack Loew 


Zipporah & Moishe Sokolow 


Lowen's Bake Shop 


Sonny's Kosher Chicken Market 


Luchow Trading Co. 


Mr. and Mrs. Aaron J. Sorcher 


Mandel's Custom Tailoring 


and Family 


Mendlowitz Food Center 


In Memory of Hyman Sossin 


Ida Mermel 


William Spira 


Paul Merriam 


Star Bakery 


Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Meyers 


Stern and Elbogen 


Mittman's Meat & Poultry 


Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Stern 


Rabbi & Mrs. B. Morgenstern 


Lillian and Peter Strauss 


Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Needleman 


Stone's Kosher Delicatessen 


& Family 


Mr. and Mrs. Jack Sultan 


Max Neustadter 


Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sultan 


Mr. Arthur Offenbach 


Mr. and Mrs. William Tauber & Sons 


Phyllis Shoe Store 


Teddy Diety 


Pozner Plumbing Co. 


Trager's Shoe Store 


Prominent Fabrics 


Mr. and Mrs. Phil Weingarten 


Propr-wauk Shoes 


Weinstein Brothers 


Jules Pugach 


Weinstein's Grocery 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry Racinstein 


A. Weitzner - Shoes 


Mr. and Mrs James Reich 


V/hite Mountain Dairy 


Mr. and Mrs. Zelig Renick 


Willie's Sandwich Shoppe 


Max Rosenberg & Family 


Windsor Lumber and Trim Corp. 


A. Rosenthal . ■, 


Wassel Fruit & Fish Store 


Mr. L. Saclow 


Brooklyn Paint and Supply Co. 


Mrs. Esther Schnabel 





■134 — 





Greetings from 


Congratulations to 


YOUNG ISRAEL 
OF FLATBUSH 


Philip Felig 

On His Graduation 


Solomon J. Sharfman, Rabbi 
Lester Rhine, Pres. 






Best Wishes to . . . 


from 


PHILIP FELIG 


Paul Steinberg 


Mr. & Mrs. Louis Tretin 






Compliments of 




MR. & MRS. AL LLOYD 




420 Ave. F 




Brooklyn, N.Y. 
31D ?tO 




Best Wishes to . . . 


To Rabbi and Mrs. S. Schmidman 




On the Birth of a Baby Girl 


Our Son 
PHILIP FELIG 


ANNITA PEARL 

From His Talmud Class 






Compliments of . . . 


Mr. & Mrs. Elias M. Felig 




Compliments of . . . 






A FRIEND 


MUTUAL CLEANERS Inc. 




237 Sheffield Ave. 




Stores Throughout Brooklyn 





13.J 



o 

C 





'"mi\ mm 



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<^Exix 



Juioms-xi. 



2.AZ-AQ West 39th Street 
New York 18, N. Y. 



i